Showing posts with label provenance. Show all posts
Showing posts with label provenance. Show all posts

Sep 24, 2021

Pinakothek Munich: artworks with no provenance transferred from the German state


Where to find the provenance of artworks held at the Pinakothek in Bavaria, Germany?

Not, it seems, on the Pinakothek website.

Frequently, the information provided in the Origin or Herkunft field limits itself to the mention: "on loan" or "transferred from the German state".

But there is no link or reference to any further information. 

Yet we know that many looted artworks returned to Germany after the war and then distributed to museums "on loan" or as "transfers").

How to verify whether or not an artwork held at the Pinakothek is referenced in the LostArt.de database, the DHM Munich or Linz databases?

To find out, we will look at a selection of artworks at the Pinakothek, many of which are "on loan" or transferred from State possession.


See file here 


Download CSV here


(please note: The dataset contains only a few hundred artworks out of the more than 8000 artworks created before 1940 that contain the word "Überweisung")

https://www.sammlung.pinakothek.de/en/search?phrase=Überweisung#filters={"yearRange":{"min":1400,"max":1940},"onDisplay":false,"publicDomain":false}

Feb 10, 2021

University Art History Challenge: What do these Provenances Have in Common?


Students of art history, test your sleuthing skills! Can you spot what these artworks might have in common? Hint: pay attention to the years 1932-1945....  

(Claude Monet, French, 1840–1926 Port-Domois, Belle-Isle1887 Photo credit: Yale University Art Gallery)


urlprovenanceMuseum
https://www.dia.org/art/collection/object/boors-concert-97709until 1840, Prince Joseph Bonaparte;purchased by Pennel (England);1842, Chaplin (England);Galerie Sedelmeyer (Paris, France);June 3-5, 1907, sold by (Féral, Paris, France) auction Ch. Sedelmeyer, lot 58;by 1932, (Gallery W.J. van Wisselingh & Co., Amsterdam, Netherlands);(Scott and Fowles, London, England and New York, New York, USA);Mary Hanna (Cincinnati, Ohio, USA);by 1939, (Knoedler & Co., New York, New York, USA);by inheritance to J. Warner Prins (New York, New York, USA);January 25, 2007, sold by (Sotheby's, New York, New York, USA) lot 5 [bought in];purchased by (Jack Kilgore & Co., New York, New York, USA);2007-present, purchase by the Detroit Institute of Arts (Detroit, Michigan, USA)Detroit Institute of Arts
https://www.dia.org/art/collection/object/morning-ride-42266the artist, Edgar Degas (Paris, France);April 9, 1921, sold by (Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, France) auction Atelier E. Degas, 3rd sale, lot 21;1921, purchased by Clariet (Paris, France);Hector Brame (Paris, France);Etienne Bignou (Paris, France);by 1932, (Howard Young, New York, New York, USA);Lewis Larned Coburn (Chicago, Illinois, USA);Annie S. Coburn (Chicago, Illinois, USA);until 1944, bequest to the Art Institute of Chicago (Chicago, Illinois, USA) as part of the Lewis Larned Coburn Collection;May 4, 1944 sold by (Parke-Bernet, New York, New York, USA);1944, purchased by (E. & A. Silberman Gallery, New York, New York, USA);1948-present, purchase by the Detroit Institute of Arts (Detroit, Michigan, USA)Detroit Institute of Arts
https://www.dia.org/art/collection/object/first-bath-42089Paris, Collection Gustave Arosa;Paris, auction G. Arosa (Hôtel Drouot), 25 February, 1878, lot 24, sold for 800 francs;Orrouy, Collection Comte Armand Doria;Paris, auction Doria (Galerie Manzi-Joyant), 4-5 May, 1899, lot 128, repr., bought by Brame for 10,500 francs;Paris, Brame, (dealer);Montréal, Collection Sir William Van Horne (by 1910, to 1915, thereafter Estate);New York, auction, Heirs of the estate of Sir William Van Horne, (Park-Bernet), 24 January, 1946, lot 8, bought by Durand-Ruel and Rosenberg and Co. for $15,250;New York, Durand-Ruel, (dealer- 1946);Grosse Pointe, Collection Robert H. Tannahill, (purchased from Durand-Ruel on 6 March, 1946 for $22,500) by whom bequeathed to the Detroit Institute of Arts in 1970.Detroit Institute of Arts
https://www.dia.org/art/collection/object/schoolboy-47283Paris, Jacques Blot, (dealer, n.d.), not in collection in 1924;Amsterdam, E. G. Van Wisselingh and Co. (dealer, n.d.);New York, Hammer Galleries, (dealer, 1966);Detroit/Miami, Collection Mr. and Mrs. Lee Hills, by whom given to the DIA in 1974.Detroit Institute of Arts
https://www.dia.org/art/collection/object/mademoiselle-de-mossellmann-riding-bois-de-boulogne-paris-42262Collection Mme de Forest Mariotti (by 1957);Paris, Brame and Lorenceau (dealer, n.d.);London, P. & D. Colnaghi and Herner Wengraf, (dealers in partnership, 1975), from whom purchased by the DIA.Detroit Institute of Arts
https://artgallery.yale.edu/collections/objects/43421Dealers Ferdinand & Julien Tempelaere, Paris, purchased from a doctor that cared for Courbet (see letter from Paul Brame, dated January 16, 1963), dealer Hector Brame (1831–99), Paris, Richard Goetz Collection, Paris and New York, brought to United States at the beginning of WWII, passed through Richard Zinser, New York (see letter of Mr. Zinser, dated 6 December 1962), Walter Bareiss Collection, New York, purchased from the Goetz estate in 1955–56.;Richard Goetz was a German national living in Paris at the outbreak of World War I. His collection was sequestered and sold by the French government at Hotel Drouot, Paris on 23 February 1922.Yale University Art Gallery
https://artgallery.yale.edu/collections/objects/51920Emile Laffont Collection, Galerie Hector Brame, Paris.Yale University Art Gallery
https://artgallery.yale.edu/collections/objects/8696Atelier of Courbevoie, Paris, Consuelo Fould Collection, Galerie Hector Brame, Paris (purchased as original, unpublished cast).Yale University Art Gallery
https://artgallery.yale.edu/collections/objects/25955Bought from Monet by Durand-Ruel, March 1887, E.J. van Wisselingh, Amsterdam, M.P. Voute, Amsterdam, c. 1938, L.E. Visser, The Hague, c. 1940, M. Visser. Laren, c. 1946, Hector Brame, Paris, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, 1968.;Bibliography;Artists on Art: Observations by Yale Faculty on Selections from the Yale University Art Gallery (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Art Gallery, 1999), 40–41, ill.Yale University Art Gallery
https://artgallery.yale.edu/collections/objects/25989The Artist, (Probably) sold to Durand-Ruel, Paris, August 10, 1885 (stock no. 723) [See Note I], Durand-Ruel, Paris, by August 25, 1891 (stock no. 1807), Sold to Francois Depeaux (1853-1920), Rouen, May 1896, Sale, Vente Depeaux, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, May 31-June 1, 1906, lot 36. Maurice Coutot (1901-1987), Paris. Galerie van Wisselingh, Amsterdam, 1938. Etienne Bignou (1891-1950), Paris and New York, by 1939. Charles Marie Paul Durand-Ruel (1905 - 1985), Paris, by 1956 until at least 1962. Sam Salz, New York, Sold to Mr. Paul (1907-1999) and Mrs. Rachel Lambert ‘Bunny’ (1910-2014) Mellon, October 20, 1965, Gift to the Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Conn;Note I: On August 10, 1885 Durand-Ruel bought eight pictures from the artist. ‘A Seated Woman’ is probably the painting of the same title, which Durand-Ruel purchased for 600 francs (Paysanne Assise, stock no.723). In 1891 Durand-Ruel reorganized his holdings of impressionist paintings, which accounts for the later discrepancy in stock no. (1807) (Per House, 1986)Yale University Art Gallery
https://artgallery.yale.edu/collections/objects/81186Peter Findlay Gallery, New York, Steven M. Kossak Collection, New York.Yale University Art Gallery
https://www.kimbellart.org/collection/ap-196803François Leroy de Sennéville, Paris, to 1780;(his sale, Paillet, Paris, 5 April 1780, no. 49, as “Paysage touffu d’Arbres,” bought in);(his sale, Paillet, Paris, 26 April 1784, no. 28);(purchased by Quenet, Paris for 144 livres).;(Possible sale, Paris, 2 May 1870, no. 13).;(Possible sale, Paris, 27 April 1872, no. 6).;François Hippolyte Walferdin [1795-1880], Paris, to 1880;(his sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, 3 April 1880, no. 15, as “La mare”);(purchased by Hector Brame for 1050 francs).;Alexis Joseph Febvre, Paris;(his sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, 17-20 April 1882, no. 10, as “Étang dans un Bois,” sold for 750 francs).;Private American collection by 1925;(Newhouse Galleries, Inc., New York);purchased by Kimbell Art Foundation, Fort Worth, 1968.Norton Simon Museum
https://www.toledomuseum.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/Provenance-Research-lowres.pdfE. J. van Wisselingh, Amsterdam;C. G. Vattier Kraane, Aerdenhout;(Frederik Müller, Amsterdam;Mar. 22-29, 1955, lot 70, repr.);1976 B. de Geus van den Heuvel;Niewersluis (Soldat auction;Sotheby Mak van Waay;Amsterdam, Apr. 27, 1976;lot 252, repr.);1976 Toledo Museum of Art (purchased;through dealer: Nystaad, The Hague);Toledo Museum of Art;Provenance Report, page 52Toledo Museum of Art
http://www.nortonsimonartfoundation.org/collections/provenance.php?id=M.1973.3.1.PTrotti, Paris, 20 April 1911, ff. 400 to;Hector Brame, Paris, in partnership with Tempelar, stock no. 2493 (2717), 2 May 1911 for Ffr. 800 to;Strölin, Paris.;Götz.;[Galerie Daber, Paris, by 1939].;A. Askin, New York.;[Arthur Tooth & Sons, Ltd., London, by 1972 – 1973 to];Norton Simon Art Foundation.Norton Simon Museum
http://www.nortonsimonartfoundation.org/collections/provenance.php?id=M.1973.7.PProbably from artist, or Mme. Redon (Camille Falte) to;Ary Leblond (aka Aimé Merlo, 1880-1958), Paris, by 1934 - by inheritance to;Henriette Merlot Ary-Leblond, Paris, by 1934, until at least 1964.;M. Renevey, Paris (?);L. Lefebvre-Foinet, Paris, by 14 February 1968, half share with;Sunion Fine Arts, Vaduz, half share sold back 7 November 1968.;[E. J. van Wisselingh & Co., Amsterdam, stock no. S8702, in 1967, sold 1970 to];Neison Harris, Northbrook, Illinois, gift 1973 to;Norton Simon Art Foundation (sale, New York, Christie’s, 19 May 1982, lot 23, ill., unsold and returned to);Norton Simon Art Foundation.Norton Simon Museum
http://www.nortonsimonartfoundation.org/collections/provenance.php?id=M.1979.60.P(Constant Troyon sale, Paris, Hotel Drouot, 22-23 January 1866, second day, lot 103, as Boeuf et poules dans une prairie, 1720 fr. to);Morel.;[M. Knoedler & Co., Paris and New York, by 1906].;Dr. Jacob Arnold Carp (1871-1942), Helmond, 1919-1942;Hendricus Egbertus ten Cate (1868-1955), Almelo, Holland, by 1942, (sale, London, Sotheby’s, 3 December 1958, lot 85, as A Bull in a meadow, to);H. A. D. Thomas, Amsterdam, still in 1963/4;[E. J. van Wisselingh & Co., Amsterdam, by 1964, stock no. S 9024, as Le Taureau, to];Mrs. Julia A.M. McInnes, Winnipeg, in 1964, by descent to;Dr. D.C. McInnes, Winnipeg, still in 1973, to;[B. Laing, half share with E. J. van Wisselingh & Co., sold 1974 to];Norton Simon, Los Angeles, N.74.19.2.P., gift 1979 to;Norton Simon Art Foundation.Norton Simon Museum
http://www.nortonsimonartfoundation.org/collections/provenance.php?id=M.1996.3.PPicq-Véron, Ermont-Eaubonne, sold 25 June 1892 to;[Durand-Ruel, Paris, sold 17 July 1892 to];Henri Vever (1854-1943), Paris (sale, Paris, Galerie Georges Petit, 1-2 February 1897, lot 112, as Effet de Neige, for ff. 2200 to);Mme Rambaud (probably Raimbaud).;Mme Cancurte, Paris.;[Hector Brame, Paris, sold 25 January 1951 to];[Arthur Tooth & Sons, Ltd., London, stock no. 2533, sold 27 February 1951 to];Audrey E. Pleydell-Bouverie, London, by bequest to;[David Gibbs, New York, sold 25 September 1968 to];The Norton Simon Foundation, transferred 1996 to;Norton Simon Art Foundation.Norton Simon Museum
http://www.nortonsimonartfoundation.org/collections/provenance.php?id=M.1997.1.3.PAlfred Beurdeley, Paris (sale, Paris, Galerie Georges Petit, 6-7 May 1920, lot 63, as Tête de femme, to);Couriot.;[Jacques Dubourg, Paris].;G. R. A. van Stolk, Bergen.;[E. J. van Wisselingh & Co., Amsterdam, stock no. S8849, by 1971, sold 19 September 1972 to];Norton Simon, acc. N.72.10.P. (sale, New York, Sotheby Parke Bernet, 2 May 1973, lot 5, as Tete de femme a la voilette);(sale, London, Sotheby Parke Bernet, 4 December 1980, lot 527, ill., as Tête de Femme à la Voilette, bought-in);Norton Simon, acc. N.81.3.P., gift of the Trust 1997 to;Norton Simon Art Foundation.Norton Simon Museum
http://www.nortonsimonartfoundation.org/collections/provenance.php?id=M.2010.1.88.PCorot estate (sale, Paris, Hôtel Drouot, 26 May 1875, lot 244, as Aux environs de Rouen, chaumière, bought-in by);Jules Chamouillet (the artist’s grandnephew).;Probably John Dix Coffin (1885-1961) New York and Quebec, to;[Manhattan Gallery, New York, sold April, 1964 to];[Wildenstein & Co., New York, sold May 1964 to];[Paul Brame].;(Sale, London, Christie’s, 6 April 1976, lot 9, ill., as Chaumiere à Bois-Guillaume, près Rouen, to);Norton Simon, by bequest to;Jennifer Jones Simon Art Trust, to;Norton Simon Art Foundation.Norton Simon Museum
http://www.moma.org/collection/works/80769The artist, London, 1913 John Quinn Collection, New York, by 1924. Purchased from the artist Findlay Galleries, New York, by 1936. Purchased at Quinn Auction, American Art Galleries, New York, February 9-12, 1927, cat. 704A. Conger Goodyear, New York, by 1937 The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of A. Conger Goodyear, 1938Museum of Modern Art
https://art.nelson-atkins.org/objects/47395/the-croquet-partyThe;artist, Paris, 1871-1879;Purchased;from the artist by Gustave Caillebotte (1848-1894), Paris, 1879-February 21;1894 [1];To his;brother, Martial Caillebotte (1853-1910), Paris, 1894-January 16, 1910 [2];Inherited;by his wife, Marie Caillebotte (née Minoret, 1863-1931), Paris or Pornic;France, 1910-October 5, 1931;By;descent to her daughter, Geneviève Chardeau (née Caillebotte, 1890-1986);Paris, 1931-1973 [3];Deposited;with Galerie Lorenceau, Paris, by a member of the Chardeau family, January 23;1973[4];Possibly;with Galerie Schmit, Paris, after January 23, 1973 [5];Purchased;[from Galerie Schmit?] by Juan Guillermo de Beistegui (1930-2017), Paris, after;January 23, 1973-January 7, 1986 [6];Purchased;from de Beistegui, through Margo Pollins Schab, New York, by Marion (née;Helzberg, 1931-2013) and Henry (1922-2019) Bloch, Shawnee Mission, KS;1986-June 15, 2015 [7];Given by Henry and Marion Bloch to The Nelson-Atkins;Museum of Art, Kansas City, MO, 2015.;NOTES;
[1] See Étienne Moreau-Nélaton;“Copie faite pour E. Moreau-Nélaton de documents sur Manet appartenant à Léon;Leenhoff,” ca. 1910, Bibliothèque nationale de France;Département des Estampes et photographie, RESERVE 8-YB3-2401, folio 79, as Croquet. On;November 20, 1883, Caillebotte added a codicil to his will stipulating that his;collection should be given to the musée du Luxembourg after his death. The;museum was notified of this bequest in early March 1894, but many of the;paintings, including The Croquet Party, were refused by the Comité;consultatif des musées nationaux after 18 months of deliberation and returned;to his brother, Martial Caillebotte. See [Adolphe] Tabarant, “Le peintre Caillebotte et sa;collection,” Bulletin de la Vie Artistique, no. 15 (August 1, 1921);405-13, and A[dolphe] Tabarant, Manet: Histoire catalographique (Paris: Éditions;Montaigne, 1931), 244.;
[2] Martial;Caillebotte, the artist’s younger brother, offered The Croquet Party to;the French government in 1904 and 1908, but it was refused both times. See;Bernard Denvir, The Chronicle of;Impressionism: an Intimate Diary of the Lives and World of the Great Artists;(London: Thames and Hudson, 1993), 198.;
[3];See emails from Gilles Chardeau, grandson of Geneviève Chardeau, to Brigid;Boyle, NAMA, July 30, 2015, Sylvie Brame, Galerie Brame et Lorenceau, to Mary;Frances Ivey, NAMA, November 30, 2018, and Sophie Pietri, Wildenstein-Plattner;Institute, to Mary Frances Ivey, NAMA, December 17, 2018, NAMA curatorial;files.;On;August 4, 1970, seventeen paintings in Chardeau’s collection, including “ The Croquet Game, ” were stolen. They;were returned anonymously to a Paris metro station in November 1970 and;restituted to Chardeau. See Janet Flanner;“Letters from Paris,” New Yorker (August;22, 1970): 85, as The Croquet Game.;
[4];See emails from Sophie Pietri, Wildenstein-Plattner Institute, to Mary Frances;Ivey, NAMA, December 17, 2018, and Sylvie Brame, Galerie Brame et Lorenceau, to;Mary Frances Ivey, NAMA, November 30, 2018, NAMA curatorial files.;A;sales receipt from Margo Pollins Schab;indicates that the painting was owned by the Peugeot family, France, before its;purchase by de Beistegui. This was published in Richard R. Brettell and;Joachim Pissarro, Manet to Matisse;Impressionist Masters from the Marion and Henry Bloch Collection, exh. cat.;(Kansas City, MO: Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 2007), 155. However, both;Pollins Schab and the Peugeot family cannot confirm this information.;Conversation with Margo Pollins Schab and Mary Frances Ivey, NAMA, January 11;2019, and email from Dominix Kirchner, Peugeot family descendant, to Mary;Frances Ivey, NAMA, February 13, 2019, NAMA curatorial files.;
[5] See email from Miguel de Beistegui, son of Juan;Guillermo de Beistegui, to Brigid Boyle, NAMA, May 15, 2015, NAMA curatorial;files. Galerie Schmit has not responded to emails.;
[6] According to Denis Rouart and Daniel Wildenstein, Edouard;Manet: Catalogue raisonné, vol. 1, Peintures;(Lausanne: Bibliothèque des arts, 1975), no. 173, the painting was owned by P.;A., Suisse, or “propriété anonyme.” De Beistegui did not live in Switzerland;and was living in Paris at the time that he purchased the work, see email from;Miguel de Beistegui, son of Juan Guillermo de Beistegui, to Brigid Boyle, NAMA;May 15, 2015, NAMA curatorial files.;
[7] Conversation with Margo Pollins Schab to Brigid;Boyle, NAMA, May 18, 2015, notes in NAMA curatorial files. According to Ms.;Schab, her gallery had The Croquet Party on consignment from Juan de;Beistegui.
Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
https://art.nelson-atkins.org/objects/17431/rehearsal-of-the-balletPurchased by Louisine Waldron Elder (later Mrs. H. O.;Havemeyer, 1855-1929), New York, by 1877-no later than January 6, 1929 [1];By descent to her daughter, Mrs. Peter Hood Ballantine Frelinghuysen;(née Adaline Havemeyer, 1884-1963), Morristown, NJ, and Palm Beach, FL, by;April 10, 1930-July 25, 1932 [2];Given to her son, George Griswold Frelinghuysen (1911-2004);Beverly Hills, CA, 1932-April 14, 1965 [3];Purchased at his sale, Impressionist;and Modern Paintings, Sculptures, Drawings: “La Glace Haute” and “Ma Maison à;Vernon” by Bonnard, “La Barque à St. Jean” and “La Madone du Village” by;Chagall, “Répétition de Ballet” by Degas, “La Baignade devant le Port de;Pont-Aven” by Gauguin, “Femme à l’Ombrelle Verte” by Matisse, “Les Peupliers”;and “Nymphéas” by Monet, “Volume de Choses” by Staël, “Les Déchargeurs” by Van;Gogh, “Portrait de la Comtesse de Noailles” by Vuillard, Sotheby’s, New;York, April 14, 1965, lot 49, as Répétition;de ballet, through Stephen Hahn, New York, by Norton Simon (1907-1993), Beverly Hills, CA, 1965- May 2, 1973;Purchased at his sale, Ten;Important Paintings and Drawings from the Private Collection of Norton Simon;Sotheby’s, New York, May 2, 1973, lot 7, as Repetition;[sic] de ballet, by Marlborough Gallery, Vaduz;Liechtenstein, May 2-November 16, 1973;Purchased from Marlborough Gallery by The Nelson-Atkins;Museum of Art, Kansas City, MO, 1973.;NOTES;[1] Elder wrote in her memoirs that she purchased the pastel;at an unnamed color shop. Scholars have not been able to definitively identify;which one, but Portier, Latouche and Père Tanguy have all been proposed.;Tanguy’s shop is cited by Susan Alyson Stein in Elder’s memoirs. See Frances;Weitzenhoffer, The Havemeyers;Impressionism Comes to America (New York: Harry;N. Abrams, 1986), 21, and Louisine W. Havemeyer, Sixteen to Sixty: Memoirs of a Collector, ed. Susan Alyson Stein;2nd ed. (New York: Ursus Press, 1993), 331n291.;The date of Elder’s purchase of the work is not certain, but;it was one of Elder’s first purchases, bought on the advice of her friend;artist Mary Cassatt (American, 1844-1926). Most scholars agree that Elder;bought the pastel by 1877, see Havemeyer, Sixteen;to Sixty, 331n291. Elder definitely owned the pastel before February 1878;when she lent it to the Eleventh Annual;Exhibition of the American Water Color Society.;[2] Louisine Havemeyer may have given the pastel to her;daughter when she married on February 7, 1907. Havemeyer writes, “As each of;you acquired a home of your own I gave to you works of art to beautify it;believing it would be the wish of Father to have me do so. These objects are;yours and the disposition you finally make of them, your responsibility.”;Havemeyer also noted, “Degas: I have given Adaline…the one I bought when a;girl.” This was probably in reference to the Nelson-Atkins’ pastel, which;Havemeyer fondly recalled her in memoires as her first Degas purchase when she;was still a teenager. See Louisine Waldron Elder Havemeyer, “Notes to My;Children” regarding disposition of Havemeyer art collection, Series II. Miscellaneous, box 3;folder 23, pp. 1, 7, The Havemeyer Family Papers relating to Art Collecting;The Metropolitan Museum of Art Archives, New York. In any case, the pastel was;not in Havemeyer’s will listing artworks to be donated to the Metropolitan;Museum of Art, New York, and it was also not among the artworks donated by;Havemeyer’s three children in 1929. It was published in the 1931 H. O. Havemeyer Collection catalogue as;being in Frelinghuysen’s collection.;[3] Paper label on the pastel’s verso inscribed: “To George;on his / 21 st birthday / from Mother”.Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/artwork/75507Elizabeth Ruth Edwards (c. 1833-1907), Fantin-Latour’s art agent, London. Gustave Tempelaere (died 1904), Paris in 1901 [Tempelaere inventory no. 4679; see letter from Sylvie Brame to Gloria Groom, dated April 10, 2002, in curatorial file]. Antonio Mancini (died 1930), Rome by 1906 until at least 1924 [acc. to Bénédite1906 and Gibson 1924]. Possibly E. Lernoud, Paris [acc. to Ottawa 1983; mentioned in Paris 1955 as the owner preceding Mancini, but this cannot be confirmed]. Mme. Vincent Daniel, Rennes by 1936 [acc. to letter from Philippe Brame to Gloria Groom, dated April 30, 2001, in curatorial file; in Grenoble 1936 she is incorrectly listed as Madame Vincent Danielo, Vannes; in Ottawa 1983, she is incorrectly located in Vennes]; sold to Hector Brame, Paris in 1951 [acc. to letter from Philippe Brame citied above]; Hector Brame and César de Hauke, Paris; sold to the Art Institute in September 1951.Art Institute of Chicago
http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/artwork/80607Mme Johanna van Gogh-Bonger, the artist’s sister in law, Amsterdam; sold through Frankfurter Kunstverein to Leonhard Tietz (died 1914), Cologne, in February 1912 [see records in van Gogh-Bonger’s account book: "19/2 2-1912 'Kunstverein Frankfurt portret' 2942.50 [guilders]" and "95/15 2-1912 'ontvangen uit Frankfort Kunstverein voor portret' 2942.50 [guilders]" in Stolwijk and Veenenbos 2002; see also Cologne 1912 where Leonard Tietz is listed as the owner]; by inheritance to his son, Alfred Tietz, Cologne until at least 1930 [acc. to Amsterdam 1930]. E. J. van Wisselingh and Co., Amsterdam, 1933 [it was included in two exhibitions at van Wisselingh]. Bignou Art Gallery, New York [based on undated photograph of the painting no. 2156 in an album of French paintings and drawings that passed through the Bignou Gallery preserved at the Frick Art Reference Gallery]; sold to Joseph Winterbotham, Burlington, Vermont by at least 1935 [see Joseph Winterbotham’s letter to Robert Harshe, dated June 10, 1935, copy in curatorial file]; given to the Art Institute, 1954.Art Institute of Chicago
http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/artwork/5828Commissioned by H. Lefuel for the south facade of the Pavillon de Flore, Tuileries Palace, Paris, 1863; models completed 1865 and in Carpeaux's studio until 1913; sold, the artist's atelier sale, Galerie Manzi-Joyant, 15 rue de la Ville-l'Éveque, Paris, December 8-9, 1913, lot 106, to Nelson for 2000 francs [according to Gazette de l'Hotel Drouot]. Consigned to Gallery Hector Brame, Paris, September 1955 [according to letter from Sylvie Brame to Brandon Ruud, November 24, 2004, copy in curatorial file; see also 1955-56 Paris exh. cat.]; sold by Hector Brame and César de Hauke to the Art Institute, 1957.Art Institute of Chicago
http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/artwork/5830Commissioned by H. Lefuel for the south facade of the Pavillon de Flore, Tuileries Palace, Paris, 1863; models completed 1865 and in Carpeaux’s studio until 1913; sold, the artist’s atelier sale, Galerie Manzi-Joyant, 15 rue de la Ville-l’Évêque, Paris, December 8–9, 1913, lot 106, to Nelson for 2000 francs [according to Gazette de l’Hôtel Drouot]. Consigned to Gallery Hector Brame, Paris, September 1955 [according to letter from Sylvie Brame to Brandon Ruud, November 24, 2004, copy in curatorial file; see also 1955-56 Paris exh. cat.]; sold by Hector Brame and César de Hauke to the Art Institute, 1957.Art Institute of Chicago
http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/artwork/5834Commissioned by H. Lefuel for the south facade of the Pavillon de Flore, Tuileries Palace, Paris, 1863; models completed 1865 and in Carpeaux's studio until 1913; sold, the artist's atelier sale, Galerie Manzi-Joyant, 15 rue de la Ville-l'Éveque, Paris, December 8-9, 1913, lot 106, to Nelson for 2000 francs [according to Gazette de l'Hotel Drouot]. Consigned to Gallery Hector Brame, Paris, September 1955 [according to letter from Sylvie Brame to Brandon Ruud, November 24, 2004, copy in curatorial file; see also 1955-56 Paris exh. cat.]; sold by Hector Brame and César de Hauke to the Art Institute, 1957.Art Institute of Chicago
http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/artwork/45838Acquired from [unknown] by a private collector, Paris. [1] 

Acquired by Sarec, S.A., Switzerland, by Dec. 1972. [2]

Sold by Sarec, S.A., Switzerland, to Paul Rosenberg & Company, New York, Dec. 1972. [3] 

Sold by Paul Rosenberg & Company, New York, to the Art Institute of Chicago, 1973. [4]

NOTES

[1] According to Paul Rosenberg & Company, to the Art Institute of Chicago, Nov. 21, 1973, curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago.

[2] According to Elaine Rosenberg. See meeting notes dated May 2002, curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago. See also Sylvie Brame, Brame & Lorenceau, to the Art Institute of Chicago, June 19, 2002, curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago: “I have asked my father about SAREC S.A. He remembers that it was a fund management company which sometimes dealt with works of art. However, it had nothing to do with Hector Brame.”

[3] According to Elaine Rosenberg, see meeting notes dated May 2002, curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago. According to Paul Rosenberg & Company, to the Art Institute of Chicago, Nov. 21, 1973, curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago, the painting was assigned the stock number 6431–2719. See also Sylvie Brame, Brame & Lorenceau, to the Art Institute of Chicago, June 19, 2002, curatorial object file, Art Institute of Chicago: “I have asked my father about SAREC S.A. He remembers that it was a fund management company which sometimes dealt with works of art. However, it had nothing to do with Hector Brame.”

[4] See minutes of the Board of Trustees, Dec. 17, 1973, on file in Institutional Archives, Art Institute of Chicago.
Art Institute of Chicago
http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/artwork/104107Thomas John Henry Vincent Lane, King's Bromley Manor, Litchfield; sold Sotheby's, London, 8 December 1926, no. 118 as John Newton and his Wife Elizabeth by Cotes to De Casseres for £56 [annotated catalogue in Ryerson Library]. Leggatt Brothers, London, by 1927 at which time the sitter’s wife was excised and portions of the portrait overpainted [according at note by Ellis Waterhouse on the reverse of a photo in the Waterhouse archive, Paul Mellon Centre, London]; sold by Leggatt to Howard Young, 1927 [according to Waterhouse inscription cited above]. Anderson Galleries, New York [according to undated newspaper clipping]. Wally Findlay Galleries, Chicago [acc. to note from Arthur B. Logan dated 7 December 1989 in curatorial files]; sold to Arthur B. Logan, Chicago, 8 March 1955; given to the Art Institute, 1985.Art Institute of Chicago
http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/artwork/72183Jacques Blot, Paris; sold to E. J. Van Wisselingh & Co, Amsterdam, 1952 [information provided in email from Marcia Zaaijer, based on Van Wisselingh photos in Rijksbureau voor Kunsthistorische Documentatie, The Hague; Wisselingh asigned the painting number S 7295]; sold to Paul Rosenberg and Co., New York, January 1953 [information from Marcia Zaaijer, as cited above]; sold to Mary and Leigh Block, Chicago, March 1953 [according to Rosenberg records provided by Elaine Rosenberg, May 2002; see also Marseille 1986-87]; given to the Art Institute, 1988.Art Institute of Chicago
http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/artwork/28862Mrs. A. C. Van Gogh Carbentus, the artist's mother, Neunen/Breda, 1885/1886 [among the works left behind by the artist when he moved to Antwerp in 1885, according to Martha Op de Coul, R.K.D., The Hague, letter of August 23, 2000]; given with other contents of the artist's studio to the carpenter, Schrauwen, Breda, in 1886, until 1903 [see Benno J. Stokvis, Nasporingen omtrent Vincent van Gogh in Brabant, Amsterdam, 1926, pp. 5-6]; transferred to Jan and Rien Couvreur, Breda, 1903 [see Stokvis as cited above]; sold by them to C. Mouwen, Jr., Breda; sold Frederik Muller, Amsterdam, May 3, 1904, no. 13 (ill.), for 205 fl. to Van Gelder [according to annotated copy of sale catalogue at the R.K.D., The Hague; the identity of Van Gelder remains unknown; he was apparently not H.E. van Gelder – information kindly supplied by Louis van Tilborgh, electronic communication 2000]. Mejevrouw K. Cosman, The Hague, by June 1935 [according to Faille, 1970, p. 617, no. 142 and stockbook of Kunsthandel Van Wisselingh & Co., Amsterdam, in R.K.D., The Hague]; sold by her to Kunsthandel Van Wisselingh & Co., Amsterdam, by June 1935 [see above; though Van Wisselingh may have acquired it from Mej. Cosman before 1935]; sold by Van Wisselingh to Harry S. Southam, Ottawa, June 24, 1935 [according to stockbook cited above]; Harry S. Southam, Ottawa, 1935 until about 1944 [the picture is omitted from a 1944 typeset catalogue of Southam's collection, and had presumably been sold by then - according to Michael Pantazzi, National Gallery of Canada, letter of July 26, 2000]. E. and A. Silberman, New York; sold to Dr. John J. Ireland (died 1968), Chicago, about 1964 [information from catalogue card]; bequeathed by him to the Art Institute, 1968.Art Institute of Chicago
https://www.harvardartmuseums.org/art/299794John Singer Sargent, gift, to Albert Besnard, 1883-84, sold, to Hector Brame, 1931, sold, to [Knoedler and Co., July 1931], sold, to Anna R. (Mrs. John D.) Mills, May or June 1935, sold, to [Knoedler & Co., October 1935], sold, to Grenville L. Winthrop [through Martin Birnbaum], New York, NY, October 1935, bequest, to Fogg Art Museum, 1943.Harvard University Art Museums
https://www.harvardartmuseums.org/art/229868Gustave Moreau, Created, 1867, Sold to Hector Brame, 1872.;Hector Brame, Purchased from the artist, 1872. Mme. Moreau (the artist's mother) recorded a payment of 1,000 francs, but Brame actually paid 2,000 for the work. See 1999 Lacambre exhibition catalogue, p. 286.;[Afferd]. From inscription on back of Winthrop photo. May be "Affert" or "Affet"?;Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, France.;Grenville Lindall Winthrop, from Galerie Georges Petit?, 1934, Bequest to Fogg Art Museum, 1943. Winthrop paid 10,000 ff.Harvard University Art Museums
https://www.harvardartmuseums.org/art/228531Edouard Vuillard, 1904. Ker-Xavier Roussel, Paris. Hector Brame, Paris.;Joseph Pulitzer, Jr., St. Louis Missouri, 1953, gift, to Fogg Art Museum, 1955.Harvard University Art Museums
https://www.harvardartmuseums.org/art/298500Jean-Antoine Vassal de Saint-Hubert, Paris, his sale, Remy, Paris, 29 March-13 April 1779, lot 251 (as "Portrait of a Man"), his estate sale, Remy-Brusley, Paris, 24 April 1783-5 May 1783, lot 101, sold, to Lepeintre (or Lepautre), Laurent Laperlier, Paris, his estate sale, Drouot (George-Delestre), Paris, 17-21 February 1879, lot 48 (as "Portrait of the Painter, Jean-Jacques Bachelier"), Étienne-Edmond de Riel, Baron de Beurnonville, Paris, his sale, Féral-George-Petit-Pillet, Paris, 9-16 May 1881, lot 27, possibly Antoine-François Marmontel, Paris, sale, Drouot (Brame-Boulland), Paris, 25-26 January 1883, lot 61, Antoine-François Marmontel, Paris, his estate sale, Drouot (Brame-Tual), Paris, 28-29 March 1898, lot 17, Sigismond Bardac, Paris, his sale, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, 10-11 May 1920, lot 17, Galerie Wildenstein, Paris (by 1921), sold, to Grenville Lindall Winthrop, New York, gift, to Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum, Gift of Grenville L. Winthrop, Class of 1886, inv. no. 1939.89Harvard University Art Museums
https://www.harvardartmuseums.org/art/227547[Daregnès, Paris]. [David Findlay Gallery, New York]. Mrs. Richard J. Bernhard, New York, c.1961, to Robert Bernhard, New York, c. 1970, to Bernhard Foundation, New York, sold [through Sotheby Parke Bernet, New York, May 26, 1976, lot 13]. [1] [R. M. Light & Co., Santa Barbara], sold, to Frances Hofer, 1977, bequest, to Fogg Art Museum, 1979;Notes;[1] Provenance in Catalogue Raisonne lists Wildenstein in between Bernhard Foundation and the Sotheby Park Bernet sale. However, this is unable to be confirmed as the auction catalogue suggests a direct transfer between the Bernhard Foundation and the auction house.Harvard University Art Museums
https://www.harvardartmuseums.org/art/269365Maurice Exteens, 1958. [Paul Brame and César de Hauke, Paris]. Sir Robert Henry Edward Abdy, London, by descent, to Sir Valentine Robert Duff Abdy, Paris. [La Galerie de L’oeil, Paris]. [E.V. Thaw & Co., New York]. [R. M. Light and Co., Boston, 1968]. Philip and Frances Hofer, Boston, Frances Hofer bequest, to Fogg Art Museum, 1978.Harvard University Art Museums
https://collections.mfa.org/objects/34853/roses-in-a-glass-vaseAcquired from the artist by Elizabeth Ruth Edwards (b. about 1833 - d. 1907), London [see note 1]. By 1906, Ferdinand Dreyfus (b. 1849 - d. 1915), Paris [see note 2], by descent to his son, Jean Ferdinand-Dreyfus (b. 1888 – d. 1962), Paris, 1942, probably confiscated from Jean Ferdinand-Dreyfus by Nazi forces and, between 1947 and 1962, recovered by the Dreyfus family [see note 3], January 23, 1962, sold by C. F. Dreyfus (Claude Ferdinand Dreyfus) and R. Schwob d’Héricourt to the Galerie Hector Brame, Paris, October 10, 1962, sold by Brame to Frost and Reed Gallery, London [see note 4], about 1962/1963, sold by Frost and Reed to Desmond Robinson, London [see note 5]. April 15, 1970, anonymous sale, Sotheby's, London, lot 3, to the Lefevre Gallery, London, for £27,000, 1970, sold by Lefevre to a private collector, Paris [see note 6]. July 1, 1974, anonymous sale, Christie's, London, lot 10, to Alice A. Hay (d. 1987), New York, 1987, bequest of Alice A. Hay to the MFA. (Accession Date: June 24, 1987);NOTES;[1] According to William Gaunt, “Fantin-Latour: In the Maturity of His Art,” Connoisseur 152 (January – April, 1963): 220-222. Edwin Edwards (d. 1879) and his wife Elizabeth were friends of Fantin-Latour and acted as dealers for him in England.;[2] He lent this painting to the "Exposition de l'Oeuvre de Fantin-Latour" (Paris, May-June, 1906), cat. no. 82, and is listed as the owner by Mme. Fantin-Latour, Catalogue de l‘Oeuvre Complet (1849-1904) de Fantin-Latour (Paris: Henri Floury, 1911), p. 148, cat. no. 1410.;[3] In 1947, a painting by Fantin-Latour of a "bouquet of roses in a glass" (“bouquet de roses dans un verre”) was listed, without dimensions or an image, among the objects that had been confiscated in 1942 from the home of Jean Ferdinand-Dreyfus, the eldest son of Ferdinand Dreyfus, and had not yet been returned. See Bureau Central des Restitutions, Répertoire des Biens Spoliés en France Durant la Guerre, 1939-1945, vol. 2, Tableaux, tapisseries, et sculptures (Berlin, 1947), p. 230, no. 5128. This painting had also been reported on Jean Ferdinand-Dreyfus’s itemized art claim to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Paris, 1945 (RA 625). The fact that the MFA painting was sold shortly after Jean Ferdinand-Dreyfus’s death by his heir indicates that, if it is the same painting, it must have been returned to the family between 1947 and 1962.;[4] Many thanks to Sophie Brame for supplying information about the Galerie Hector Brame transactions.;[5] According to Gaunt, 1963 (as above, n. 1). There is also a Frost and Reed label affixed to the reverse of the painting dated 1965, at which time it was evidently at the gallery for restoration or framing work.;[6] According to correspondence from Jodie Waldron of the Lefevre Gallery (August 24, 2006). The painting was included in the exhibition "XIX & XX Century French Paintings" (Lefevre Gallery, London, November 12 - December 19, 1970), cat. no. 7.Museum of Fine Arts Boston
https://collections.mfa.org/objects/34879/venus-clipping-cupids-wings1875, Arthur Stevens (b. 1825 - d. 1909), Brussels. 1878, Alfred de Knyff (b. 1819 - d. 1885), Brussels and Paris. By 1895, Émile Dekens, Brussels, 1897, sold by Dekens, through Durand-Ruel, Paris, to Henry Osborne Havemeyer (b. 1847 - d. 1907) for Oliver Hazard Payne (b. 1839 - d 1917), New York [see note 1], by inheritance to his nephew, Harry Payne Bingham (b. 1887 - d. 1955), New York, until 1987, by descent within the family. Anonymous gift to the MFA. (Accession Date: January 20, 1988);NOTES;[1] See Frances Weitzenhoffer, The Havemeyers: Impressionism Comes to America (New York: Abrams, 1986), pp. 125-126.Museum of Fine Arts Boston
https://collections.mfa.org/objects/35480/the-reaper-with-a-sickleUntil 1887, Léon Meinard, Paris, January 28, 1887, Meinard sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, lot 5, to Alfred Robaut (b. 1830 - d. 1909), Paris, for 350 fr [see note 1]. 1889, Paul-Arthur Chéramy, Paris [see note 2]. Philippe de Saint-Albin, Paris. By 1928 until at least 1936 (and probably through 1942 or later), Albert S. Henraux (b. 1881 - d. 1953), Paris [see note 3]. February 29, 1956, sold by Hector Brame and Cesar de Hauke (dealers), Paris, to M. Knoedler and Co., New York (stock no. A6296), May 7, 1956, sold by Knoedler to William Appleton Coolidge (b. 1901 - d. 1992), Topsfield and Cambridge, MA, 1993, bequest of William A. Coolidge to the MFA. (Accession Date: January 27, 1993);NOTES;[1] According to Alfred Robaut, L'Oeuvre de Corot: Catalogue Raisonné et Illustré (Paris, 1905), cat. no. 380. [2] He lent it to the Exposition Centennale de l'Art Français (Paris, 1889), cat. no. 158 bis (as "Femme a la Serpe"). [3] He lent the painting to the "Exposition d'Oeuvres de Camille J. B. Corot, Figures et Paysages d'Italie," Paul Rosenberg, Paris, June 6 - July 7, 1928, cat. no. 18 and "Corot," Musée de L'Orangerie, Paris, 1936, cat. no. 33. Germain Bazin published the painting as being in the Henraux collection in 1942, see his "Corot" (1942), p. 116, cat. no. 51.Museum of Fine Arts Boston
https://collections.mfa.org/objects/32592/dance-at-bougivalApril 16, 1883, deposited by the artist with Durand-Ruel, Paris, November 12, 1884, returned to the artist, February 19, 1886, deposited by the artist with Durand-Ruel and shipped to New York, November 22, 1886, sold by the artist to Durand-Ruel and sold the same day to Mme. Hiltbrunner, June 15, 1889, deposited by Mme. Hiltbrunner with Durand-Ruel, August 25, 1891, sold by Mme. Hiltbrunner to Durand-Ruel and, in September, 1891, transferred back to Paris [see note 1], January 2, 1894, sold by Durand-Ruel, Paris to Félix-François Depeaux (b. 1853 - d. 1920), Rouen, May 31 - June 1, 1906, Depeaux sale, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, lot 38, to Depeaux's brother-in-law, Edmond Décap, Paris, by descent to Maurice Barret-Décap, Biarritz, France, 1937, sold by Barret-Décap, possibly through Anthony H. Manley, Paris [see note 2] to the dealers Paul Brame (b. 1898 - d. 1971) and César de Hauke (b. 1900), Paris, for Jacques Seligmann et Fils, Paris [see note 3], March 19, 1937, transferred from Seligmann, Paris, to Jacques Seligmann and Co., New York, April, 1937, sold by Seligmann, New York, to the MFA for $150,000. (Accession Date: May 5, 1937);NOTES;[1] The early provenance and information about Durand-Ruel's transactions is taken from Colin B. Bailey, Renoir, Impressionism, and Full-Length Painting (exh. cat. Frick Collection, New York, 2012), p. 212.;[2] Maurice Barret-Décap owned the painting until at least February 9, 1937, as his correspondence with Seligmann attests. The provenance provided by Seligmann at the time of the painting's acquisition lists the name of Anthony Manley after that of Barret-Décap. The gallery's shipping papers from March 19, 1937, note that it was purchased from Manley on February 13 (year illegible, presumably 1937), Manley also wrote to Seligmann on April 3, 1937, regarding the payment of interest on the painting. It is possible that Barret-Décap sold the work to Seligmann through Manley, that the two men owned it jointly, or that Manley owned the work for a very short period of time, around February 9-13, 1937.;[3] De Hauke was a sales representative for Jacques Seligmann and Co. While he purchased works of art that were sold by the gallery, the ownership of the objects was often officially shared by several art dealers, and the transactions became quite complicated. De Hauke and Brame worked together on several occasions.Museum of Fine Arts Boston
https://collections.mfa.org/objects/32816/portrait-of-a-man-and-woman-in-an-interiorFebruary 17, 1802, anonymous ("M. W...") sale, Rue de Bouloy, Paris, lot 27 [see note 1]. May 17, 1824, anonymous sale, Hôtel de Bullion, Paris, lot 48 [see note 2]. 1841, Charles-August-Louis Joseph (b. 1811 - d. 1865), Duc de Morny, April 27, 1841, Morny sale, G. Benou, Paris, lot 17, unsold, November 25, 1842, Morny sale, Paillet, Paris, lot 14, unsold, February 25-26, 1845, Morny sale, Hôtel des Ventes, Paris, lot 63 [see note 3], sold for 1,505 francs to Cousin. Désiré van den Schrieck (b. 1786 - d. 1857), Louvain, April 8-10, 1861, posthumous Schrieck sale, at his gallery, Louvain, lot 68, sold to Ferdinand Laneuville (d. 1866) for 3,500 francs, possibly for the Comte Duchâtel, Paris [see note 4]. By 1934, Robert Lebel (b. 1901 - d. 1986), Paris [see note 5], between 1934 and 1936, sold by Lebel to Walter Westfeld (b. 1889 - d. after 1942), Elberfeld (Wuppertal) and Düsseldorf, Germany [see note 6]. 1941, E. and A. Silberman Galleries, New York [see note 7], 1941, sold by Silberman to the MFA for $7500. (Accession Date: December 11, 1941);NOTES;[1] Described as a work on panel by Eglon van der Neer, 27 by 25 inches, depicting a Dutch couple whose black dress indicates they are a burgomaster and his wife, sitting in an interior with a fireplace and a table with fruit on it.;[2] Eddy Schavemaker kindly provided this information.;[3] The paintings included in the February 1845 sale were sold on Morny's behalf under the name of Jean-Jacques Meffre, who served as his art advisor and painting conservator. See Robin Emlein, "La Collection du duc de Morny, Étude du goût pour les écoles du Nord en France au XIXe siècle," Master's thesis, École du Louvre, 2007, vol. 1, pp. 41-44 and vol. 2, pp. 121-122 (cat. B100).;[4] Émile Leclercq, "Correspondance Particulière," Gazette des Beaux-Arts 1861, pp. 180-181. Laneuville, an expert at the sale, was also buying for the Comte Duchâtel. This painting, however, does not appear in subsequent sales of paintings from the Comte Duchâtel collection.;[5] The painting was included in the exhibition held at Robert Lebel's gallery at 13, rue de Seine, Paris, "Une Collection de Tableaux de Petits Maitres Hollandais & Flamands," December 11-28, 1934, cat. no. 25. An old photograph of the painting exists in Lebel's photographic archive, it is annotated on the back: "Eglon van der Neer.;[6] Robert Lebel visited the MFA on October 8, 1943 and told curator W. G. Constable that he had sold this painting to Walter Westfeld around 1937. According to a letter from Walter Westfeld's brother to the MFA (February 6, 1944), Lebel had written to him in the fall of 1943 as well, stating that around 1935/1936 he had sold the painting to Westfeld, who had it at the Galerie Kleucker and "at a time, in Amsterdam." A painting described as a Company Scene by Eglon van der Neer, which is probably the present painting, was exhibited at the Galerie August Kleucker, Düsseldorf, in mid-May, 1936.;[7] A photograph of the painting, supplied to the MFA by Silberman, bears W. R. Valentiner's authentication on the reverse, dated May 15, 1941. The painting was first offered to the MFA on June 3, 1941. A subsequent letter from dealer Abris Silberman to W. G. Constable of the MFA (June 3, 1942) states that "the painting was brought to this country by a refugee some time ago" but had never been in a U.S. collection. Attempts to determine when and how Silberman acquired the work have not been successful.;ADDITIONAL INFORMATION;In 1920 Walter Westfeld opened a gallery that bore his name in Elberfeld (present-day Wuppertal). However, under the Nazi regime he was forced to discontinue his business because he was Jewish, the Galerie Walter Westfeld officially closed on May 27, 1936. Several months later, his associate August Kleucker was put in charge of liquidating the gallery stock through the Galerie Kleucker in Düsseldorf. It is not known whether this painting had formed part of Westfeld's gallery stock or whether he owned it privately, thus it is not known if it was part of the 1936 liquidation through Kleucker. In the fall of 1937, Westfeld was forced to turn over to the Gestapo a list of all the works of art still in his possession, the Van der Neer does not appear on this list. Whether it was no longer in Westfeld's possession at this time, or had been deliberately left off the list, is uncertain.;In November 1938 Westfeld was arrested for foreign exchange violations. He was subsequently found guilty of having -- after the closure of his gallery -- illegally shipped works of art and other assets abroad, to Paris and Amsterdam, and of continuing to sell his own works of art through Kleucker. Whether the Van der Neer left his possession in one of these ways is not known. According to correspondence from a family member to the MFA (November 11, 2004), Westfeld had paintings and other valuables at the Rotterdamse Wisselbank in Amsterdam as late as 1939, again, it is not known if the Van der Neer could have been among these. The valuables were apparently taken unlawfully and sold during World War II, and remain untraced.;In 1939 Nazi authorities seized Westfeld's remaining art assets in Germany and auctioned them through Lempertz, Cologne, on December 12-13, 1939. The Van der Neer painting was not included in this sale.;After Westfeld's trial in Nazi Germany, he served a prison sentence at Lüttringhausen. In 1942 he was sent to the Theresienstadt concentration camp and, in 1943, to Auschwitz. He was declared deceased at the end of World War II.;In June, 2011 the MFA reached a financial settlement with the heirs and the estate of Walter Westfeld for the Portrait of a Man and Woman in an Interior, allowing the work to remain at the museum. This was based on a review of the above research, which outlines a limited number of ways the painting could have left his possession. It seems unlikely that Westfeld gave or sold the painting voluntarily after the closure of his gallery in May, 1936. Rather, as a Jewish art dealer living in Nazi Germany, he probably disposed of it due to persecution.;Bibliography: Herbert Schmidt, Der Elendsweg der Düsseldorfer Juden: Chronologie des Schreckens, 1933-1945 (Düsseldorf: Droste, 2005), pp. 273-278, Victoria S. Reed, "Walter Westfeld (1889-1943?), Art Dealer in Nazi Germany," in Vitalizing Memory: International Perspectives in Provenance Research (Washington, DC: American Association of Museums, 2005), Monika Tatzkow, in Verlorene Bilder, Verlorene Leben: Jüdische Sammler und was aus ihren Kunstwerken wurde (Munich, 2009), pp. 87-97, and Victoria Reed, "Walter Westfeld and the van der Neer Portrait in Boston: The Case Study of a Jewish Art Dealer in Düsseldorf," in Alfred Flechtheim: Raubkunst und Restitution, ed. Andrea Bambi and Axel Drecoll, Schriftenreihe der Vierteljahrshefte für Zeitgeschichte, vol. 110 (Berlin: Walther de Gruyter, 2015), pp. 179-188.Museum of Fine Arts Boston
https://collections.mfa.org/objects/33556/la-japonaise-camille-monet-in-japanese-costumeApril 14, 1876, Monet and Ernest Hoschedé sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, lot 37 [see note 1]. April 19, 1877, anonymous ("L.") sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, lot 48, to Constantin de Rasty (d. 1923), Paris, 1918, sold by Rasty to Paul Rosenberg and Co., Paris and New York [see note 2], 1920, sold by Rosenberg to Philip Lehman (b. 1861 - d. 1947), New York [see note 3], 1921, sold by Lehman to Duveen Brothers, Inc., London [see note 4], 1937, shipped from Duveen, London to Duveen, New York, 1956, sold by Duveen to the MFA for $45,000. (Accession Date: March 8, 1956);NOTES;[1] Traditionally referred to as Monet's sale, the auction was organized by Ernest Hoschedé (b. 1837 - d. 1891) and included several works belonging to him, leading Hélène Adhemar ("Ernest Hoschedé," in Aspects of Monet: A Symposium on the Artist's Life and Times, ed. John Rewald and Frances Weitzenhoffer [New York: Abrams, 1984], p. 61) to suggest it was a joint sale and Hoschedé "was without a doubt in possession of the Monet paintings" ("il était sans doute en possession des tableaux de Monet"). When the painting was acquired, Edward Fowles of Duveen Brothers stated that "it was originally in the collection of a Mr. Hoschede" (letter to W. G. Constable, MFA, February 16, 1956).;[2] René Gimpel noted on August 10, 1918, that the dealer Georges Bernheim informed him that "Rosenberg has bought a life-size Monet, a Japanese woman." See his "Diary of an Art Dealer", trans. John Rosenberg (New York, 1966), p. 55, also pp. 59 (August 19) and 67 (October 29). Monet himself wrote to Rosenberg about the painting (August 6, 1918, copy of letter in curatorial file).;[3] In the brief notice "New Monet for New York," American Art News XVIII, no. 18 (February 21, 1920): p. 1, the painting is said to have "recently been purchased by a New York collector." Edward Fowles (as above, n. 1) stated that "Philip Lehman purchased it from Paul Rosenberg.;[4] According to a memo from the London office to the Paris office of Duveen Brothers (December 31, 1926, Duveen Brothers Records, Getty Research Institute, Box 267, folder 24). The official sale date is given, in a memo to the New York branch of the gallery (December 13, 1937), as January 1, 1922.Museum of Fine Arts Boston
https://www.getty.edu/art/collection/objects/703/camille-pissarro-landscape-at-louveciennes-autumn-french-1870/Provenance 1873 - 1891;Durand-Ruel & Cie, consigned by the artist, 1873, sold to P. A. B. Widener, 1891. 1891 - 1906;Peter Arrell Brown Widener, 1834 - 1915 (Elkins Park, Pennsylvania), sold to Durand-Ruel & Cie, 1906. 1906 - 1934;Durand-Ruel & Cie (New York, New York, Paris, France), sold to Mme. Henri Goldet, 1934.;Source: JPGM Paintings Department, curatorial files, letter from Caroline Durand-Ruel Godfroy, January 23, 2001. 1934 -;Mme Henri Goldet, by inheritance to Roger Goldet. - 1979;Roger Goldet [sold, Sotheby's, London, December 5, 1979, lot 15.] -;Pierre Jourdan-Barry, French - 1982;Brame-Lorenceau (Paris, France), sold to the J. Paul Getty Museum, 1982.J. Paul Getty Museum
https://www.getty.edu/art/collection/objects/751/gustave-moreau-dejanira-autumn-french-about-1872-1873/Provenance 1873 - 1881;Lepel-Cointet (Paris, France) [sold, Lepel-Cointet sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, June 10, 1881, lot 30, to Hector Brame], purchased from the artist, 1873.;Source: Paris, Musée Gustave Moreau, archives, Lepel-Cointet / Moreau correspondence, 1872-73, Getty Research Institute, annotated copy of Lepel-Cointet sale catalogue. 1881 -;Hector Brame - about 1885;Charles Hayem (Paris, France), sold to Jules Beer, about 1885. about 1885 - 1913;Jules Beer (Paris, France) [sold, Beer sale, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, May 29, 1913, lot 18, through Durand-Ruel & Cie (Paris, France) to Edmond James de Rothschild.] 1913 - 1934;Baron Edmond James de Rothschild, Austrian, 1845 - 1934 (Paris, France), by inheritance to Maurice (Edmond Charles) de Rothschild, 1934. 1934 - 1957;Baron Maurice Edmond Charles de Rothschild, French, 1881 - 1957 (Chateau de Pregny, Geneva, Switzerland), by inheritance to Edmond (Adolphe Maurice Jules Jacques) de Rothschild, 1957. 1957 - 1980;Baron Edmond Adolphe Maurice Jules Jacques de Rothschild, French, 1926 - 1997, sold to Colnaghi, 1980. 1980 - 1984;Colnaghi (London, England, New York, New York), sold to the J. Paul Getty Museum, 1984.J. Paul Getty Museum
https://www.getty.edu/art/collection/objects/760/jean-francois-millet-man-with-a-hoe-french-1860-1862/Provenance 1863;Ennemond Blanc (Paris, France) 1863;Alfred Stevens, Belgian, 1823 - 1906 (Paris, France), possibly to Gustave Robert, 1863. 1863 -;Gustave Robert (Paris, France) by 1881 -;Sénateur Prosper Crabbe (Brussels, Belgium) -;Eugène Secrétan, 1836 - 1899 (Paris, France) by 1883 - 1886;Defoer (Paris, France) [sold, Defoer sale, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, May 22, 1886, lot 27, to Hector Brame.] 1886 -;Hector Brame (Paris, France) by 1887 -;Mr. L. by 1889 -;C. van den Eynde (Brussels, Belgium) by 1893 - 1937;William H. Crocker, American, 1861 - 1937 (San Francisco, California), by inheritance to his heirs, 1937. 1937 - 1985;Heirs of William H. Crocker, American, 1861 - 1937 (San Francisco, California), sold through Judith Landrigan (New York, New York) to the J. Paul Getty Museum, 1985.J. Paul Getty Museum
https://www.getty.edu/art/collection/objects/106542/gustave-moreau-diomedes-devoured-by-horses-french-1866/Provenance 1869;Galerie Brame -;Charles Hayem (Paris) -;Emmanuel Berl (Paris) -;Private Collection (Paris) November 23, 1992;Hôtel Drouot, lot 24 -;Private Collection (France)J. Paul Getty Museum
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.102496.htmlAtelier Degas, Paris, until 1917 (Lugt 657), (Third Degas sale, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, 7 - 9 April 1919, no. 76). (sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, 17 March 1933, no. 29), (Hector Brame, Paris). Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, Upperville, VA, 1968, gift to NGA, 1999.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.102497.htmlAtelier Degas, Paris, until 1917 (Lugt 657), (sale, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, 7 - 9 April 1919, no. 160.2), Dr. Georges Viau [1855-1939], Paris, until 1942, (his sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, 11 December 1942, no. 42). (sale, Palais Galliera, Paris, 9 December 1968, Lot #A), (Hector Brame, Paris), Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, Upperville, VA, gift to NGA, 1999.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.103550.html(A.A. Hébrard, Paris), Degas heirs, sold 9 September 1962 to (Hector Brame, Paris), sold 9 March 1964 to Paul Mellon [1907-1999], Upperville, Virginia,[1] bequest 1999 to NGA.;[1] Sylvie Brame, e-mail dated 27 August 2008 to Anne Halpern. Mr. Mellon's acquisition date is given in his collection records as May 1964. E-mail and Mellon records are in NGA curatorial files.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.110318.html(A.A. Hébrard, Paris), Degas heirs, sold to (Hector Brame, Paris), sold January 1964 to Paul Mellon [1907-1999], Upperville, Virginia,[1] bequest 1999 to NGA.;[1] Mellon collection records, in NGA curatorial files.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.135512.htmlThe artist [1849-1883], Paris, (her estate sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, 20 February 1885, no. 54). Lanvin, Paris, at least in 1932.[1] Acquired 1994 by Simon Rosenberg, purchased 10 July 2006 through (Brame & Lorenceau, Paris) by NGA.;[1] This is possibly the fashion designer Jeanne Lanvin. At least some of her collection was inherited into the Polignac family, into which her daughter had married.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.30231.htmlVauthrin, by 1855 until at least 1867.[1] Laurent-Richard, (Laurent-Richard sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, 23 May 1878, no. 6, as Le Ruisseau du Puits-Noir [vallée de la Loue, Doubs], 13,100 francs). E. Secrétan [d. 1899], Paris.[2] Etienne-François-Haro [1827-1897] and his son, Henri Haro [1855-1911], Paris, (their sale, Galerie Sedelmeyer, Paris, 30-31 May 1892, no. 69, as Le Ruisseau du Puits-Noir, probably bought in), sold 15 October 1897 by Haro to (Durand-Ruel et Cie, Paris, stock no. 4447),[3] sold 19 October 1897 to Henry Osborn Havemeyer [1847-1907] and his wife, née Louisine Waldron Elder [1855-1929], New York,[4] by inheritance to their daughter, Mrs. P.H.B. Frelinghuysen, née Adaline Havemeyer [1884-1963], Morristown, New Jersey, gift 1943 to NGA.;[1] Lent to Exposition universelle, Paris, 1855, no. 2810, and to Oeuvres de M.G. Courbet au Rond-Point de l'Alma, Paris, 1867, no. 20. Vauthrin's name is spelled "Vauthrain" in the catalogue of 1855.;[2] The painting was not included in the Secrétan sale at Christie's, London, on 13 July 1889.;[3] Concerning Durand-Ruel's acquisition of the painting, see Splendid Legacy: The Havemeyer Collection, exh. cat., The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1993: 312.;[4] Frances Weitzenhoffer, The Creation of the Havemeyer Collection, 1875-1900, Ph.D. diss., The City University of New York, 1982: 261-262. See also Frances Weitzenhoffer, The Havemeyers: Impressionism comes to America, New York, 1986: 117, which mentions the sale to the Havemeyers.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.42932.htmlThe artist to (Hector Brame, Paris), c. 1874.[1] Armand-François-Paul des Frisches, comte Doria [1824-1896], château d'Orrouy, (his sale, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, 4 May 1899, no. 55, as Italienne). Charles Guasco, (his sale, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, 11 June 1900, no. 13), purchased by Mme Robert Esnault-Pelterie,[2] her son, Robert Esnault-Pelterie [1891-1957], until 1954.[3] (Galerie Nathan, Zurich) and (Sam Salz, New York),[4] sold 10 June 1954 to the Avalon Foundation, New York, for NGA.;[1] Alfred Robaut, L'oeuvre de Corot, Paris, 1905: III:296, no. 2146.;[2] According to the catalogue of a 1910 exhibition at the Galerie Georges Petit, Paris.;[3] See correspondence between Robert Esnault-Pelterie and Jacques Seligmann Gallery dated 1949-1954 in Seligmann papers, Archives of American Art, Washington, Box 34 (copies in NGA curatorial files). Esnault-Pelterie had the painting on consignment with Seligmann until 1954.;[4] Letter dated 26 April 1999 from Galerie Nathan, in NGA curatorial files.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.52085.html(Ambroise Vollard [1867-1939], Paris). Auguste Pellerin [1952-1929], Paris, by inheritance to René Lecomte, Paris, Lecomte family collection, Mme. Louis de Chaisemartin, née Germaine Charlotte Lecomte, sold 1970 through (Hector Brame, Paris) to NGA.[1];[1] Acquired with funds provided by Paul Mellon.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.52161.htmlGeorges Ibos, Paris, (Ibos sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, 19 June 1900, no. 11), purchased by (Durand-Ruel, Paris), sold 14 November 1935 to (E.J. van Wisselingh and Co., Amsterdam).[1] M.P. Voûte, Jr., Amsterdam, sold 1937 to (E.J. van Wisselingh and Co., Amsterdam), sold 1937 to (M. Knoedler and Co., New York),[2] sold 12 December 1942 to (Harry MacNeil Bland Galleries, New York),[3] sold 1942 to Ailsa Mellon Bruce [1901-1969], New York, bequest 1970 to NGA.;[1]Letter from Durand-Ruel & Cie dated 20 December 1977 in NGA curatorial files.;[2]Letter from E.J. van Wisselingh & Co. dated 3 January 1978 in NGA curatorial files.;[3]Letter from M. Knoedler & Co. dated 18 November 1977 in NGA curatorial files.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.52188.html(Rosenberg, Paris), sold 1 March 1900 to (Durand-Ruel, New York and Paris),[1] sold 1938 to (E.J. van Wisselingh, Amsterdam), sold 1938 to Henry Stevenson Southam [1875-1954], Ottawa.[2] Possibly Whitney.[3] (Carroll Carstairs Gallery, New York), sold 27 June 1946 to Ailsa Mellon Bruce [1901-1969], New York,[4] bequest 1970 to NGA.;[1] According to letter dated 20 December 1977 from Charles Durand-Ruel, citing DR Paris stock number 5723.;[2] According to letter dated 3 January 1978 from M. van der Ven (Secretary, E.J. van Wisselingh & Co.). They had no further information about to whom the painting was sold by Mr. Southam. This may be the painting Port d'Argenteuil lent by Southam to an exhibition at the National Gallery in Ottawa in May 1944.;[3] According to the provenance given in Daniel Wildenstein's 1974 catalogue raisonné of Monet's work. Wildenstein's records indicate that this name was given to them by the previous owner, but they had no further information. In 1977 NGA asked John Hay Whitney of New York if the painting had been in his collection, but he responded that it had not been owned by any member of his Whitney family.;[4] Provenance according to NGA curatorial records and the Ailsa Mellon Bruce notebook now in NGA archives.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.61365.html(Boudin sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, 28 February 1877, no. 9).[1] Hutinel, Paris M. Laisné, consigned 1962 to (Hector Brame, Paris),[2] sold 1962 to Mr. Paul Mellon, Upperville, VA, gift 1983 to NGA.;[1]According to Robert Schmit, Eugene Boudin, 1984, vol I: no. 840. However, copies of two sales catalogues from this date at the Frick Art Reference Library does not include any Boudins.;[2]See letter from Philippe Brame, dated 8 June 1999, in NGA curatorial files.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.61369.htmlAcquired from the artist in November 1888 by (Boussod, Valadon et Cie., Paris and New York), sold 16 September 1889 to Montandon.[1] (Ambroise Vollard [1867-1939], Paris), by 1922 until at least 1936.[2] Possibly (Etienne Bignou, Paris).[3] William A. Cargill [d. 1962], Carruth, Scotland, by 1956,[4] (his estate sale, Sotheby's, London, 11 June 1963, no. 29), purchased by Acciarri for (Hector Brame, Paris) for Paul Mellon, Upperville, [5] VA, gift 1983 to NGA.;[1] According to La Ronde des petites Bretonnes, exh. cat., Musée des beaux arts, Rennes, 1997, p. 6.;[2] Listed in the Vollard inventory of 1 January 1922, as 'Danse bretonne 72 x 92 10000,' Archives Vollard, Musée d'Orsay, Paris. Lent by Vollard to exhibitions in Paris and New York in 1936.;[3] A photograph of this painting is included in the albums from the Bignou Gallery, now at the documentation center of the Musée d'Orsay (copy, NGA curatorial files).;[4] According to John Rewald, Post-Impressionism from van Gogh to Gauguin, 1956, p. 289, the painting was in a private collection in Scotland at that time, this is probably Cargill. See also Frances Fowle, Impressionism and Scotland, Exh. cat., National Galleries of Scotland, 2008, p. 127.;[5] Annotated sales catalogue in the library of the National Gallery of Scotland, Acciarri also listed in Paul Mellon papers in NGA curatorial files.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.61374.html(Durand-Ruel, Paris), sold 1890 to Henri Vever [1854-1942], Paris, (his sale, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, 1-2 February 1897, no. 78), purchased by (Georges Petit) for Marie-Albert, vicomte de Curel [1827-1908], Paris,[1] by descent in his family, (de Curel sale, Palais Galliera, Paris, 21 June 1961, lot C),[2] purchased by (Hector Brame, Paris) for Mr. Paul Mellon, Upperville, Virginia, gift 1983 to NGA.;[1] See reports of the Vever sale published in the Gazette de l'Hôtel Drouot no. 35-36, 4-5 February 1897 and the Chroniques des Arts et de la Curiosité, as well as the annotated sale catalogue, copies in NGA curatorial files. The NGA picture was not included in the 25 November 1918 Curel estate sale held at the Galerie Georges Petit (originally scheduled for 3 May 1918). The vicomte de Curel, for whom the painting was purchased, has been identified by François Auffret, Président of La Société des Amis de Jongkind in Paris (founded 1970), with confirmation from the collector's descendants. With M. Auffret's kind permission, his research was shared with the NGA by Dr. Diana Kostyrko (see her e-mails from October through December 2008 in NGA curatorial files).;[2] According to press coverage of the 1961 sale, the picture had been in the collection of Barbara Church, an American collector who lived in Ville-d'Avray and had died the preceding year. However, the sale in which the NGA painting figured actually consisted of six pictures from the de Curel collection, the Barbara Church sale, held the same day at the Palais Galliera, was one of several estate sales of the Church collection held in 1961.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.61375.htmlDr. Georges de Bellio [1828-1894], Paris, probably by inheritance to M and Mme [she née Victorine de Bellio,1863-1958] Ernest Donop de Monchy, Paris.[1] Sold 1907 for or by von Tschudi through (Boussod, Valadon et Cie., Paris).[2] (Galerie Caspari, Munich)in 1916.[3] Mrs. Meta Schütte, Bremen, by c. 1919 and probably in Schütte family collection until c. 1948,[4] by inheritance to her granddaughter and her husband, Dr. and Mrs. F.M. Oelze, Bremen.[5] (E.J. van Wisselingh and Co., Amsterdam), sold February 1951 to (Wildenstein and Co., London, New York, and Paris),[6] by whom sold December 1956 to Arnold Kirkeby, New York, (his sale, Parke-Bernet Galleries, New York, 19 November 1958, no. 12), Mr. and Mrs. George Friedland, Merion, Pennsylvania, (their sale, Parke-Bernet Galleries, New York, 13 December 1961, no. 80). (M. Knoedler & Co., London, New York and Paris), sold January 1965 to Mr. Paul Mellon, Upperville, Virginia, gift 1983 to NGA.;[1] No. 85 bis in inventory of de Bellio collection cited in Remus Niculescu, "Georges de Bellio, l'Ami des Impressionistes (I)," Paragone no. 247, September 1970, p. 52. See also letter from Niculescu to Paul Mellon, dated 12 April 1970, in NGA curatorial files.;[2] According to Wildenstein 1974, no. 101.;[3] According to 1961 Parke-Bernet sales catalogue.;[4] Published by Emil Waldmann, "Bremer Privatsammlungen," Kunst und Künstler XVII, 1919, p. 176. Also published as Schütte collection in the listing of "Monet paintings in some well-known museums and private collections" included in Oscar Reuterswärd, Monet, En konstnärshistorik, Stockholm, 1948, p. 279.;[5] According to 1961 Friedland sales catalogue.;[6] See letter dated 18 June 1999 from Wildenstein & Co. regarding date of acquisition from Van Wissellingh and sale to Kirkeby (in NGA curatorial files).National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.61379.htmlFrom the artist in 1876 to Dr. Georges de Bellio [1828-1894], Paris, by inheritance to M and Mme [she née Victorine de Bellio,1863-1958] Ernest Donop de Monchy, Paris, until at least 1897. Possibly (Paul Rosenberg and Co., London, New York, and Paris).[1] Georges Menier, Paris, by 1924,[2] (Menier sale, Palais Galliera, Paris, 15 June 1965, no. 121), purchased by (Hector Brame, Paris) for Paul Mellon [1907-1999], Upperville, VA, gift 1983 to NGA.;[1] The painting is cited as no. 86 in an unpublished inventory of the de Bellio collection by Remus Niculescu, "Georges de Bellio, l'Ami des Impressionists (I)," Paragone 247 (September 1970). See also the letter from Niculescu to Paul Mellon dated 12 April 1970, in NGA curatorial files. This could be the Monet "Femme au monticule" sold by Donop de Monchy to Paul Rosenberg on 16 April 1917 (Receipt, Paul Rosenberg Archives, Museum of Modern Art, New York, file 1.c.24b, copy in NGA curatorial files);[2] The painting was lent by Menier to the Première exposition de collectionneurs au profit de la Société des Amis du Luxembourg, Paris, in 1924.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.61382.htmlCharles Le Coeur [1830-1906], sold 14 May 1924 by the Le Coeur family to (Hector Brame, Paris), sold 2 December 1924 to Comte de Rivaud, his heir, Mrs. Gambert de Loche, sold 10 April 1958 to (Hector Brame, Paris),[1] sold July 1958 to Mr. Paul Mellon, Upperville, Virginia, gift 1983 to NGA.;[1] See invoice dated 30 July 1958 from Hector Brame and letter from Philippe Brame dated 8 June 1999, both in NGA curatorial files.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.66399.htmlMarc Bazille, brother of the artist, his daughter, Mme Meynier de Salinelles-Bazille, Montpellier, by 1935 until at least 1949.[1] (sale, Palais Galliéra, Paris, 19 June 1963, unnumbered), purchased by (Hector Brame, Paris), sold 1963 to Paul Mellon, Upperville, VA,[2] gift 1985 to NGA.;[1] Lent by Mme Meynier de Salinelles-Bazille exhibitions in Paris in 1935 and to the Royal Academy exhibition in 1949.;[2] Acquisition and source according tp Paul Mellon records in NGA curatorial files.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.66411.htmlPossibly (Galerie Paul Vallotton, Lausanne).[1] (Hector Brame, Paris), sold June 1964 to Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, Upperville, Virginia, gift 1985 to NGA.;[1] A label on the back of the painting gives his name and city.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.66421.html(sale, Sotheby's, London, 24 April 1963, no. 99), purchased by (Hector Brame, Paris) for Mr. Paul Mellon, Upperville, VA, gift 1985 to NGA.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.66430.htmlPurchased from the artist 18 October 1890 by (Boussod, Valadon et Cie., Paris), sold 23 November 1891 to Elkins, New York,[1] sold by 1892 to (Durand-Ruel, Paris).[2] Paul Harth, Paris, by 1930.[3] (Paul Rosenberg and Co., London, New York and Paris). (Galerie Étienne Bignou, Paris and New York), by 1939.[4] (Alex Reid & Lefèvre, London). William A. Cargill [d. 1962], Carruth, Scotland, (his estate sale, Sotheby's, London, 11 June 1963, no. 34), purchased by (Hector Brame, Paris)[5] for Mr. Paul Mellon, Upperville, VA, gift 1985 to NGA.;[1] For the date of the sale to Elkins, see John Rewald, "Theo van Gogh, Goupil, and the Impressionists, part II," Gazette des Beaux-Arts (February 1973).;[2] The painting was exhibited at Durand-Ruel in 1892.;[3] The painting was lent by Harth to an exhibition at the Musée de l'Orangerie in 1930.;[4] The painting was published as in the Bignou collection by Venturi and Pissarro in 1939.;[5] Provenance according to Paul Mellon records in NGA curatorial files.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.66436.htmlMarie-Albert, vicomte de Curel [1827-1908], Paris,[1] by descent in his family to Mlle de Curel, Paris,[2] (de Curel sale, Palais Galliéra, Paris, 21 June 1961, no. D), purchased by (Hector Brame, Paris) for Mr. Paul Mellon, Upperville, Virginia, gift 1985 to NGA.;[1] The vicomte de Curel has been identified by François Auffret, Président of La Société des Amis de Jongkind in Paris (founded 1970), with confirmation from the collector's descendants. With M. Auffret's kind permission, his research was shared with the NGA by Dr. Diana Kostyrko (see her e-mails from October through December 2008 in NGA curatorial files). The NGA painting was not included in the 25 November 1918 Curel estate sale held at the Galerie Georges Petit (originally scheduled for 3 May 1918).;[2] The painting was lent by Mlle de Curel to the 1932 Royal Academy exhibition in London.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.66461.html(A.A. Hébrard, Paris), Degas heirs, (sale, "Coll. M.X....,"[1] Hôtel Drouot, Paris, 24 November 1964, no. 41), purchased by (Hector Brame, Paris) for Paul Mellon [1907-1999], Upperville, Virginia, gift 1985 to NGA.;[1] Anonymous seller identified by Paul Brame as a Degas heir, see copy of his letter to Paul Mellon, dated 3 December 1964, in NGA curatorial files.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.66462.html(Adrien-Aurélien Hébrard [1865-1937], Paris). Possibly sold or consigned to (Max Kaganovitch, Paris), by 1949, sold 4 September 1951 through (Frankart S.A., Switzerland) to (Alex Reid & Lefèvre, London).[1] Possibly sold to (Curt Valentin, New York),[2] sold 1955 to (M. Knoedler && Co., New York);sold 1956 to (Paul Rosenberg & Co., New York).[3] sold, apparently after 1958,[4] to Dr. Hugo Tesoriere, (sale, Sotheby's, London, 24-25 November 1964, 1st day, no. 58), purchased by (Hector Brame, Paris) for Paul Mellon [1907-1999], Upperville, Virginia,[5] gift 1985 to NGA.;[1] Sara Campbell, "A Catalogue of Degas' Bronzes," Apollo (August 1995): 42, cat. 64, Joseph S. Czestochowski and Anne Pingeot, Degas Sculptures. Catalogue Raisonné of the Bronzes, Memphis, 2002: 21, 120, 247. Kaganovitch allegedly bought and showed a nearly full set of "O" casts in his Paris gallery's Degas exhibition of 1949 before selling the set to Reid and Lefevre and then organizing with them an exhibition at the Kunstmuseum in Bern in 1951-1952. A bronze of this subject indeed appears in general installation photographs of the 1949 Paris exhibition (Dossier Kaganovitch, Documentation du Musée d'Orsay, Paris), although Kaganovitch reportedly also owned the "F" cast as well, albeit later, in 1952. For the discussion of the sale to Reid and Lefevre Gallery before the Bern exhibition, see "Introduction to the Collection," in Czestochowski and Pingeot 2002.;[2] Campbell 1995: 42, cat. 64. Czestochowski and Pingeot 2002: 247, proposes that the D cast is involved instead.;[3] Campbell 1995: 42, Czestochowski and Pingeot 2002: 247.;[4] A cast belonging to Paul Rosenberg was exhibited at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1958.;[5] Confirmation by the late Philippe Brame, personal communication to Anne Halpern, 13 January 2003, see also Mellon collection records in NGA curatorial files.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.66465.html(Adrien-Aurélien Hébrard [1865-1937], Paris), sold 12 July 1926 to (Flechtheim, Dusseldorf).[1] private collection, France,[2] (sale, Sotheby's, London, 29 November 1967, no. 14), purchased by (Hector Brame, Paris) for Paul Mellon [1907-1999], Upperville, Virginia,[3] gift 1985 to NGA.;[1] According to the archives of the Hébrard foundry, cited in Anne Pingeot, Degas Sculptures, Paris, 1991: 153-197. Joseph S. Czestochowski and Anne Pingeot (Degas Sculptures. Catalogue Raisonné of the Bronzes, Memphis, 2002: 231) state that the cast left France in 1967. Since the stock from Alfred Flechtheim's Dusseldorf and Berlin galleries, when he closed them in 1933, was mostly sent to the Mayor Gallery in London or the Galerie Simon in Paris, it appears this cast probably went to the latter. Flechtheim moved to London after he closed his galleries, and died there in 1937.;[2] This information was kindly provided by Aleksandra Todorovic, Director, Impressionist and Modern Art, Sotheby's, London, in an e-mail dated 14 January 2009 to Anne Halpern, in NGA curatorial files.;[3] Confirmation by the late Philippe Brame, personal communication to Anne Halpern, 13 January 2003, see also Mellon collection records, NGA curatorial files.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.66477.html(M. Knoedler & Co., New York). Mrs. Edward Hutton, Long island, (sale, Sotheby's, London 1 July 1964, no. 10), acquired by (Hector Brame) for Paul Mellon [1907-1999], gift 1985 to NGA.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.66478.html(M. Knoedler & Co., New York). Mrs. Edward Hutton, Long island, (sale, Sotheby's, London 1 July 1964, no. 11), acquired by (Hector Brame) for Paul Mellon [1907-1999], gift 1985 to NGA.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.66506.htmlPierre Gaut, Paris, after 1942, Heinz Berggruen, Paris, by 1959, (sale, Sotheby's, London, 23 April 1968, no. 24), purchased by (Hector Brame, Paris) for Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, gift 1985 to NGA.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.66509.html(sale, Sotheby's, London, 1 May 1969, no. 272), purchased by (Hector Brame, Paris) for Paul Mellon [1907-1999], gift 1985 to NGA.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.66510.htmlCarl Pissarro, (sale, Sotheby's, London, 3 July 1969, no. 214), purchased by (Hector Brame, Paris) for Paul Mellon [1907-1999], gift 1985 to NGA.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.72012.htmlThe estate of the artist, 1901,[1] Maurice Joyant [1864-1930], by whom bequeathed to Mme M.G. Dortu,[2] sold 1 August 1950 through (Hector Brame, Paris)[3] to Mr. and Mrs. John Hay Whitney, New York, gift 1990 to NGA.;[1]The painting bears the estate stamp (the monogram HTL in a circle, in red) at the lower left corner.;[2] Joyant bequest to Madame Dortu according to The John Hay Whitney Collection, The Tate Gallery, London, 1961. Madame Dortu lent the painting to a 1931 exhibition.;[3]See Whitney records now in NGA curatorial files.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.74268.htmlH.P. Bremmer, The Hague, the Netherlands, by descent in Bremmer family, (E.J. van Wisselingh & Co., Amsterdam), Mrs. J.G. ter Kuile-ter Kuile, Switzerland (sold Houston, Christie, Manson & Woods [New York], April 6, 1970, no. 61), Armand Hammer Collection, 1970, gift to NGA, 1991.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.76209.html(Art market, London), acquired 5 February 1962 to (Hector Brame, Paris), purchased March 1962 by Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, Upperville, Virginia,[1] gift 1992 to NGA.;[1] Provenance information from donor's records.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.76218.htmlGift 1888 from the artist to John Peter Russell [1858-1931], Belle-Isle-en-Mer, (sale, Paris, Hôtel Drouot, 31 March 1920, no. 63), (Le Garrec Art Gallery, Paris), (d'Audretsch Art Gallery, The Hague), (Lutz Art Gallery, Berlin), Georg S. Hirschland [1885 -1942], Essen and later New York, by descent to his nephew Richard S. Hirschland [1913-1960], Englewood, NJ, (Hector Brame, Paris), 1965, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, Upperville, VA, 1965, gift to NGA, 1992.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.91589.htmlPurchased from the artist by Wilhelm Uhde, 1906, (Galerie Caspari, Munich), sold 1915 to Hertha Koenig [1884-1976], Munich,[1] sold 1950 to (Justin K. Thannhauser, New York),[2] W. Somerset Maugham, St.-Jean-Cap-Ferrat, (his sale, Sotheby's, London, 10 April 1962, no. 26), purchased by (Hector Brame, Paris) for Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, Upperville, VA, gift to NGA, 1996.;[1] Christian Geelhaar, Picasso. Wegbereiter und Foerderer seines Aufsteigs 1899-1939, Zurich, c. 1993: 73-75.;[2] Correspondence in the Thannhauser files at ZADIK [Zentralarchiv des Internationalen Kunsthandels, Cologne], transcriptions in NGA curatorial files.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.92998.htmlPierre Bonnard [1867-1947], (his estate sale, Galerie Charpentier, Paris, 23 February 1954, no. 30). Sir Alexander Korda, (his sale, Sotheby's, London, 14 June 1962, no. 31), purchased through (Hector Brame, Paris) by Mr. Paul Mellon, Upperville, VA,[1] gift 1995 to NGA.;[1]See Paul Mellon files now in NGA curatorial records.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.93063.htmlCharles Marcotte d'Argenteuil (died 1864), Paris, by inheritance to his son, Joseph Marcotte (died 1893), Paris, by inheritance to his widow, Madame Joseph Marcotte, née Paule Aguillon (died 1922), Paris, by inheritance to her daughter, Madame Marcel Pougin de la Maisonneuve, née Elisabeth Marcotte (died 1939, Durtol), by inheritance to her daughter-in-law, Madame Vve Xavier de la Maisonneuve [née Yolande de Beauregard, later Madame François de Calmels-Puntis], by descent through the family, purchased 1963 by (Galerie Hector Brame, Paris), purchased 1963 by Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, Upperville, VA, gift to NGA, 1995.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.93072.html(E.J. van Wisselingh & Co., Amsterdam), Mrs. Bertram L. Smith, (Helene C. Seiferheld Gallery Inc., New York), Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, Upperville, VA, 1964, gift to NGA, 1995.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.93073.html(E.J. van Wisselingh & Co., Amsterdam), Mrs. Bertram L. Smith, (Helene C. Seiferheld Gallery Inc., New York), Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, Upperville, VA, 1964, gift to NGA, 1995.National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection/art-object-page.94903.htmlAtelier Degas, Paris, until 1917 (Lugt 657), René de Gas [1845-1921], Paris, (sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, 10 November 1927, no. 20), Roland Nepveu-de Gas [1885-1962], Paris, until at least 1931. Armand Dorville [1875-1941], Paris, (sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, 24 November 1964, no. 33), (Hector Brame, Paris), Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon, Upperville, VA, until 1999, gift to NGA, 1999.National Gallery of Art
http://collection.cmoa.org/CollectionDetail.aspx?item=1024932Gustave Tempelaere, Paris; Arnold & Tripp, London and Paris; Albert Dubosc, Sainte Adresse, France, c. 1936; Private Collection, Paris; [from Philippe Brame, Galerie Brame-Lorenceau, Paris]; purchased by Museum, October 1984.

Updated by CGK
July 2012
Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh
https://www.clevelandart.org/art/1951.356Provenance 1903-1913 Family of the artist, sold to Bernheim-Jeune 1913-1935 (Bernheim-Jeune, Paris, sold to L’Art Moderne) 1 1935 (L'Art Moderne, Lucerne) 2 1935 (L'Art Moderne sale, Hôtel Drouot, June 20, 1935 (no. 59), sold to André Schoeller) 1935- (André Schoeller [1898-1991], Paris)? (Charles Comiot, Paris 3 Until 1951 (César de Hauke and Hector Brame, Paris, sold to the Cleveland Museum of Art) 4 1951- The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH;Provenance Footnotes 1 Bernheim-Jeune purchased the painting (stock number 20114) from Julie Pissarro, the artist's widow, on December 17, 1913. 2 L’Art Moderne was a branch of Bernheim-Jeune located in Lucerne, Switzerland, a number of works from its stock were auctioned at Hôtel Drouot on June 20, 1935. 3 Comiot was a businessman and art collector who had amassed a significant collection of Impresisonist works by the late 1920s. The Wildenstein Pissarro catalogue raisonné includes Comiot as a previous owner of the painting, but does not provide dates or documentation for his ownership. A sale of works from Comiot’s collection at Hôtel Drouot on June 11, 1958 does not include the CMA painting. A Renoir pastel sold at Sotheby’s, New York, on May 10, 2001 also has Comiot followed by de Hauke in its provenance, so the two may have had an ongoing business relationship. 4 The Pissarro does not appear in Galerie Brame & Lorenceau’s stock books, so it is likely that Hector Brame, a close business associate of de Hauke, brokered the sale of the painting to CMA.;Provenance Citations;Hôtel Drouot. T ableaux modernes, aquarelles, pastels, dessins par Bonnard, Boudin, Céria, Cézanne... June 20, 1935.;Guy-Patrice Dauberville, letter to Victoria Sears Goldman, July 28, 2015, in CMA curatorial file.;Pissarro, Joachim, Joachim Pissarro, and Claire Durand-Ruel Snollaerts. Pissarro: critical catalogue of paintings. Paris: Wildenstein Institute Publications, 200;Pissarro, Ludovico Rodo, and Lionello Venturi. Camille Pissarro, son art--son œuvre. Paris: P. Rosenberg, 1939.;Sylvie Brame, email to Victoria Sears Goldman, Jan. 29, 2015, in CMA curatorial file.;Sylvie Brame, email to Victoria Sears Goldman, Jan. 30, 2015, in CMA curatorial file.;Pissarro, Joachim, Joachim Pissarro, and Claire Durand-Ruel Snollaerts. Pissarro: critical catalogue of paintings. Paris: Wildenstein Institute Publications, 2005.;Hôtel Drouot. Tableaux modernes, aquarelles, pastels, dessins par Bonnard, Boudin, Céria, Cézanne, Chagall, Corot, Coubine, Courbet, Cross, Degas, Derain, R. Dufy, Dufresne, Eberl, Gauguin, Van Gogh, Guillaumin, Laglenne, Marquet, Modigliani, Monet, Monticelli, Pascin, Picasso, Pissarro, Quizet, Renoir, Rouault, Signac, Souverbie, Utrillo, Vallotton, Vlaminck. 1935.;César de Hauke, letter to Henry S. Francis, Nov. 17, 1951, in CMA curatorial file.;Guy-Patrice Dauberville, letter to Victoria Sears Goldman, Oct. 13, 2015, in CMA curatorial file.Cleveland Museum of Art
https://www.clevelandart.org/art/1953.212Provenance 1894-1929 Alexandre Natanson [1867-1936], Paris 1 1929 (Natanson sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, May 16, 1929, lot 122, sold to Georges Bénard) 1929-1933 Georges Bénard, Paris 1933 (Bénard sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, June 9, 1933, lot 90, sold to Henri Blum) 2 1933- Henri Blum, Paris 3 Until 1953 (César de Hauke, New York, sold to Knoedler & Co.) 4 1953 (Knoedler & Co., New York, sold to the Cleveland Museum of Art) 1953- The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH;Provenance Footnotes 1 This painting is one of nine canvases that Alexandre Natanson, director of La Revue blanche, commissioned from Vuillard in 1893 for his home in the Avenue du Bois de Boulogne. The decorative cycle, entitled Jardins publics (Public Gardens) was dismantled when the Natanson family moved to the Avenue des Champs-Elysées, where it was reinstalled in 1908. Natanson’s collection was sold at auction in 1929, and the cycle was dispersed: five paintings are now in the Musée d’Orsay, the pendant to the CMA painting is at the Musées Royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, one panel is in the collection of the Houston Museum of Fine Arts, and the current location of the ninth panel is unknown 2 The Cleveland painting was sold together with La promenade (no. 89), also from the Jardins public cycle, to Henri Blum. Modigliani's Portrait of a Woman (CMA 1951.358) also appeared in the Bénard sale (no. 67). 3 Blum, a collector of Impressonist works who was active in Paris throughout the 1930s and 1940s, lent the CMA painting to a 1938 Vuillard exhibition at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs. 4 This sale may have been brokered by Parisian dealer, Paul Brame. Galerie Hector Brame, at which Paul Brame worked, appears in the painting’s provenance in the Salamon/Cogeval Vuillard catalogue raisonné. However, according to the gallery, there is no reference to the painting in their stock books. Paul Brame and César de Hauke were close acquaintances and often made purchases in conjunction with one another. The Knoedler inventory card, which makes no mention of Brame, does not specify the date de Hauke sold the painting (stock no. A5278) to Knoedler, but CMA records indicate the transaction took place in May 1953.;Provenance Citations;Édouard Vuillard, Series IV Inventory Cards, M. Knoedler & Co. records, box 140, Getty Research Institute.;Salomon, Antoine, Guy Cogeval, and Mathias Chivot. Vuillard, the Inexhaustible Glance: Critical Catalogue of Paintings and Pastels. Milan: Skira, 2003.;Sylvie Brame, email to Victoria Sears Goldman, Jan. 29, 2015, in CMA curatorial file.;Sylvie Brame, email to Victoria Sears Goldman, Jan. 30, 2015, in CMA curatorial file.;Édouard Vuillard, Series IV Inventory Cards, M. Knoedler & Co. records, box 166, Getty Research Institute.;Exposition E. Vuillard: mai-juillet 1938. [Paris]: Musée des arts décoratifs, 1938.;Salomon, Jacques. Vuillard. [Paris]: A. Michel, 1945.;Hôtel Drouot. Tableaux modernes, aquarelles, pastels, dessins, lithographies. May 16, 1929.;Hôtel Drouot. Tableaux modernes, aquarelles, gouaches, pastels. June 9, 193;Hôtel Drouot. Tableaux modernes, aquarelles, gouaches, pastels. June 9, 1933.;d'Argencourt, Louise, Roger Diederen, and Alisa Luxenberg. European Paintings of the 19th Century. Cleveland: Cleveland Museum of Art, 1999.Cleveland Museum of Art
https://www.clevelandart.org/art/1973.31Provenance 1882 (Sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, April 6, 1882, no. 82, probably sold to Bernheim-Jeune) 1 1882- (Probably Bernheim-Jeune, Paris) By 1892 - by 1896 Consul Eduard Friedrich Weber [1830-1907], Hamburg 2 1896 (Ribot (his widow) estate sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, France, May 30, 1896, no. 3) 1911 (Probably Bernheim-Jeune, Paris) 3 1931- (Bernheim-Jeune, Paris) 4 By 1972-1973 (Galerie Brame and Lorenceau, Paris, sold to the Cleveland Museum of Art) 1973- The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH;Provenance Footnotes 1 “Bernheim,” presumably referring to Bernheim-Jeune, is written in as the buyer of the Ribot in an annotated copy of the sale catalogue. 2 Weber is listed as the owner of a painting, La petite laitière, with a title and size matching those of the CMA picture in an 1892 exhibition of works by Ribot. It seems unusual that the painting was with Weber in 1892, and was subsequently sold in the estate sale of Ribot’s widow in 1896. But because the Cleveland painting appears neither in an 1887 auction of paintings from his collection, nor in a 1907 catalogue of his nineteenth-century paintings, it is possible that Weber sold the work privately and it was eventually added to the estate sale in 1896. 3 The Ribot was likely exhibited at Bernheim-Jeune in the 1911 Exposition T. Ribot (no. 13, La petite laitière), as art historian Gabriel Weisberg does not believe that the artist painted any other versions of the subject. 4 It appears that this painting was once again with Bernheim-Jeune: the presence of a Bernheim-Jeune stock number (6292) on the stretcher corresponds to the gallery's purchase of Ribot's "Jeune fille au chien" in June 1931 from an unidentified seller. The gallery's archives do not record the date it was sold to the subsequent owner.;Provenance Citations;Gabriel P. Weisberg, fax to Roger Diederen, Jan. 25, 1996, in CMA curatorial file.;Guy-Patrice Dauberville, letter to Victoria Sears Goldman, Feb. 2, 2016, in CMA curatorial file.;d'Argencourt, Louise, Roger Diederen, and Alisa Luxenberg. European Paintings of the 19th Century. Cleveland: Cleveland Museum of Art, 1999.;Ribot, Théodule. Exposition Ribot: du jeudi 2 au mercredi 8 février 1911...: Paris... chez MM. Bernheim Jeune & cie. Paris: Bernheim Jeune, 1911.;Hôtel Drouot. Tableaux, études, aquarelles, dessins par Théodule Ribot. May 30, 1896.;Hôtel Drouot. Catalogue de tableaux modernes. April 6, 1882.;Sertrat, Raoul. Exposition Th. Ribot: au Palais national de l'École des beaux-arts: ouverte du 3 mai au 31 mai 1892. Paris: Impr. de l'art, E. Ménard, 1892.Cleveland Museum of Art
https://www.clevelandart.org/art/1973.33Provenance Until 1881 Probably Paul de Laage, sold to Goupil & Cie. 1 1881-1887 (Goupil & Cie, Paris) 2 1887 (Goupil & Cie sale, Hôtel Drouot, May 25-27, 1887 (no. 43), sold to Hector Brame) 1887- (Hector Brame, Paris) 3 Until 1908 Paul-Arthur Chéramy [1840-1912], Paris 1908 (Chéramy sale, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, May 5-7, 1908 (no. 159), probably sold to Schoeller or Haro on behalf of Comte André Pastré 4 Probably 1908 - at least Comte André Pastré [1888-1960], Paris 5 Until 1952 David David-Weill [1871-1952], Paris, to his wife, Flora David-Weill 6 By 1963 - probably 1970 Flora David-Weill [1878-1970], Paris 7 By 1972 (Robert Schmit, Paris, probably sold to E.V. Thaw) 8 1973- The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH Date description;Provenance Footnotes 1 At the Salon of 1827 Delacroix presented a painting titled “Portrait de M. le comte de P[alatiano] en costume souliote,” a Greek aristocrat whom the artist may have met in Paris in late 1825 or early 1826, when the Count was on his way to London. In his 1885 catalogue of Delacroix’s oeuvre, Alfred Robaut used an engraving by Frédéric Villot, a student and friend of Delacroix, to illustrate the artist’s portrait of the Count of Palatiano. Executed in 1833, Villot’s engraving can be assumed to be an accurate representation of the Salon portrait. The background in the engraving more closely matches the simple background found in the Cleveland painting than it does the more detailed background in another version of the painting, known to be an autograph work, currently in the National Gallery of Prague. For many years, it was supposed that the painting now in Cleveland was the Salon picture. But after years of analysis and debate, it has been concluded, based on the painting’s formal characteristics as well as its provenance, that the Cleveland picture is one of numerous copies after a lost original—possibly the Salon painting. According to Robaut, the painting’s early provenance included, Villot, Heymann, Verdier, and Petit, but he may have partially confused its history with that of yet another portrait of Palatiano attributed to Delacroix, this one in a New York private collection. The Cleveland picture's whereabouts can be secured by January 26, 1881, when it was purchased from “de Laage” by Goupil & Co. De Laage is likely Paul de Laage, a prodigious collector of works by Delacroix who appears frequently in connection with works by Delacroix in the Goupil stock books. 2 Goupil's purchase the of the painting from de Laage is confirmed by the presence on the painting’s stretcher of the monogram and number “G&C 15510,” a stock number Goupil would later assign the painting, and which is cross-referenced in the stock books with its originally assigned number, 15099. The Goupil ledger lists a “Figure turque” accompanied by stock no. 15099 (Goupil Book 10, Stock No. 15099, Page 146, Row 15, http://archives.getty.edu:30008/getty_images/digitalresources/goupil/jpgs/900239-vol10-146.jpg, Dealer Stock Books, Getty Research Institute), purchased on January 26, 1881. Then, just one week later, the ledger shows a sale of “Figure turque” to Comte Pedro de Daupias for ff 6,700. One week after that, on February 7, Daupias sold the painting back to Goupil, where it now was assigned stock no. 15136, and on that same day, “Hattat” bought it for ff 7,500 (Goupil Book 10, Stock No. 15136, Page 149, Row 7, http://archives.getty.edu:30008/getty_images/digitalresources/goupil/jpgs/900239-vol10-149.jpg). Just one day later, on February 8, Hattat sold the painting back to Goupil for ff 4,200, and it was given stock no. 15138 (Goupil Book 10, Stock No. 15138, Page 149, Row 9, http://archives.getty.edu:30008/getty_images/digitalresources/goupil/jpgs/900239-vol10-149.jpg). On April 4, 1881, Goupil sold the painting for ff 7,500 to Goldschmidt & Co. of Frankfurt, who sold it back to Goupil on June 22 for ff 2,430, and it was assigned stock no. 15510, the number inscribed on the stretcher. Six years later, probably within days of the Goupil liquidation sale on May 35, 1887, it was offered for sale and failed to sell (Goupil Book 10, Stock No. 15510, Page 174, Row 6, http://archives.getty.edu:30008/getty_images/digitalresources/goupil/jpgs/900239-vol10-174.jpg), it was likely bought in by Drouot commissaire-priseur Escribe, who gave ff 4,200 to Goupil for the painting according to the stock book. The painting finally sold at the Goupil liquidation sale to dealer Hector Brame for ff 2,550 (Goupil Book 11, Stock No. 15510, Page 33, Row 14, http://archives.getty.edu:30008/getty_images/digitalresources/goupil/jpgs/900239-vol11-033.jpg). Lee Johnson, author of the Delacroix catalogue raisonné, argues that all of this back and forth indicates that even in the 1880s, the painting’s attribution was in doubt. He says that Goupil, too, knew it was not an autograph work, titling it “Figure turque” so as to distance it from Delacroix’s portrait of Palatiano. Former CMA curator William S. Talbot suspected, however, that the Goupil ledger entries do not record actual sales, as it seems unlikely that the picture would have been bought and then returned at such brief intervals, even if its attribution was questioned, but rather indicate consignments to dealers. Still, one must wonder whether the picture would have been assigned a new stock number after each consignment, new stock numbers are more typically given if a painting enters the same dealer’s possession at different points in time. While it may be debatable whether dealer sales do or should impact attribution, it seems clear from the numerous transactions within less than a year and the six-year period that followed in which it remained with the Goupil until it was put up for auction, that the painting’s authorship was questioned, if not doubted. Other attributions suggested by scholars have included Alexandre-Marie Colin, Richard Parkes Bonington, Adolphe Mouilleron, and the engraver Villot. 3 The record books of Brame & Lorenceau do not cover this period, and so the present-day gallery was unable to confirm the buyer and date of sale of this painting. 4 According to the Johnson catalogue raisonné, the Dieterle Family records at the Getty Research Institute, which include records from Galerie Georges Petit, say that dealer André Schoeller purchased the painting at the Chéramy sale on behalf of Pastré. However, at least one annotated copy of the sale catalogue gives the buyer as “Haro” (and a purchase price of ff 18,100), most likely referring to Henri Haro, son of Étienne-François Haro, both were dealers and collectors. While the Dieterle records are perhaps more likely to be accurate than an annotation, it is also possible that Haro, not Schoeller, was the agent who made the purchase on behalf of Pastré. 5 The Cleveland picture was certainly in Pastré’s possession by 1910, when he is listed as its owner in an exhibition at Galerie Georges Petit. In 1930 he was listed as the owner in Louis Hourticq’s monograph of Delacroix’s oeuvre. He may have owned the painting as late as 1950, when a footnote in the annotated edition of Delacroix’s journal from that year gives Pastré as the current owner. 6 Exhibition labels on the back of the painting, as well as a "DW" monogram and what is likely an inventory number (37/5), situate the painting in the collection of David-Weill. 7 Flora David-Weill likely came into possession of the painting when her husband died in 1952, we know with certainty that she had the painting by 1963, when she is listed as its owner in the 1963 Louvre exhibition, Centenaire d’Eugène Delacroix. 8 The painting appears in a 1972 exhibition held at Galerie Schmit in Paris. While it is possible that Thaw may have acted as an agent for Schmit for the sale of the picture to CMA, because Museum records make no reference to Schmit in connection with the transaction, it is more likely that Thaw purchased it outright from Schmit.;Provenance Citations;Alexandre Rosenberg, letter to Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Cohen, Feb. 14, 1983, in CMA curatorial file.;E.V. Thaw & Co., invoice, March 8, 1973, in CMA curatorial file.;Musée des beaux arts de Strasbourg. Cent ans de peinture française: exposition au profit de Musée des Beaux-Arts de Strasbourg: du 15 mars au 20 avril, 1922. Paris: [publisher not identified], 1922.;Sérullaz, Maurice. Mémorial de l'exposition Eugène Delacroix, organisée au Musée du Louvre à l'occasion du centenaire de la mort de l'artiste, Paris. 1963. [Paris]: Éditions des Musées nationaux, 1963.;Ganay, Emilie. Exposition de chefs-d'oeuvre de l'école française: 20 peintres du 19e siècle. [Paris?]: [Verlag nicht ermittelbar], 1910.;Johnson, Lee. The Paintings of Eugene Delacroix A Critical Catalogue. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1981.;Lee Johnson, letter to Sherman E. Lee, Sept. 23, 1974, in CMA curatorial file.;Galerie Schmit. Les impressionnistes et leurs précurseurs, exposition, 17 mai - 17 juin 1972. 1972.;Musée du Louvre. Centenaire d'Eugène Delacroix, 1798-1863, Musée du Louvre, mai-septembre 1963. [Paris]: Ministère d'État, Affaires culturelles, 1963.;Hourticq, Louis. Delacroix, l'oeuvre du maitre. 1930.;Joubin, André. Journal de Eugène Delacroix. 3: 1857-1863. Paris: Plon, 1950.;Hôtel Drouot. Tableaux, aquarelles, dessins de l'école moderne. 1887;Goupil Stock Books, http://piprod.getty.edu/starweb/stockbooks/servlet.starweb?path=stockbooks/stockbooks.web, Getty Research Instititut;Sérullaz, Maurice. Mémorial de l'exposition Eugène Delacroix, organisée au Musée du Louvre à l'occasion du centenaire de la;Chéramy, P. A. Catalogue des tableaux anciens et modernes, aquarelles, pastels, dessins... Très importante collection d'oeuvres de Constable et d'Eugène Delacroix, primitifs italiens composant la collection P.-A. Cheramy: Vente, Galerie Georges Petit, les mardi 5, mercredi 6 et jeudi 7 mai 1908, commissaire-priseur Me F. Lair-Dubreuil. Paris: Henri Haro, 1908.;Cheramy, Paul Arthur, Julius Meier-Graefe, and Erich Klossowski. La collection Cheramy: catalogue raisonné précédé d'études sur les maîtres principaux de la collection. Munich: R. Piper et Cie, 1908.;Goupil Book 10, Stock No. 15099, Page 146, Row 15, http://archives.getty.edu:30008/getty_images/digitalresources/goupil/jpgs/900239-vol10-146.jpg, Dealer Stock Books, Getty Research Institute.Cleveland Museum of Art
https://www.clevelandart.org/art/1976.130Provenance?-1936 Monsieur Romanelli 1936 (Hôtel Drouot, Paris, Dessins, tableaux, estampes par Cézanne, Degas, Forain...tout appartenant à monsieur R., November 21, 1936, no. 8) 1?-? Professor François Lyon, Lyon?-1976 (Hector Brame-Jean Lorenceau, Paris, sold to the Cleveland Museum of Art) 1976- The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH;Provenance Footnotes 1 As Joueuse de flûte.;Provenance Citations;Letter from Philippe Brame to Louise S. Richards, September 2, 1976. The Cleveland Museum of Art Archives.Cleveland Museum of Art
https://www.clevelandart.org/art/1977.120Provenance Henri Lerolle (1883, 1913), by descent. Brame & Lorenceau, Paris. Purchased by Mr. and Mrs. Noah L. Butkin. Given to the CMA in 1977.Cleveland Museum of Art
https://www.clevelandart.org/art/1980.233Provenance 1976 (Couturier sale, Hôtel Drouot, March 19, 1976 (lot 42), sold to Galerie Brame and Lorenceau) 1 1976 (Galerie Brame and Lorenceau, Paris, sold to Marianne Feilchenfeldt) 2 1976-1977 (Marianne Feilchenfeldt, Zürich, sold to Noah L. Butkin) 1977-1980 Noah L. Butkin [1918-1980], Cleveland, OH, bequeathed to the Cleveland Museum of Art as a result of disclaimer by Muriel S. Butkin 1980- The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH;Provenance Footnotes 1 This auction catalogue notes that the sale consists of the “Succession de Madame C[outurier]…et appartenant à divers,” which indicates that while the sale included the estate of Madame Couturier, it also contained the property of other, unnamed collectors. The catalogue does not specifiy the former owner of the Bonvin. There were a number of collectors and other art world figures by the name of Couturier active in Paris at this time, and further details of “Madame Couturier’s” identity are unknown. 2 The gallery’s archives record the purchase of the Bonvin at Hôtel Drouot on October 5, 1976, and its sale to dealer Marianne Feilchenfeldt on August 27, 1976.;Provenance Citations;Marianne Feilchenfeldt, letter to Sherman Lee, July 30, 1977, in CMA curatorial file.;Marianne Feilchenfeldt, invoice, Sept. 5, 1977, in CMA curatorial file.;Estate of Noah L. Butkin, Bequests to Cleveland Museum of Art as a result of disclaimer by Murel S. Butkin. Estates, Gifts, and Funds, Series 1, Box 2:14. Cleveland Museum of Art Archives.;Snite Museum of Art, and Gabriel P. Weisberg. Breaking the Mold: The Legacy of the Noah L. and Muriel S. Butkin Collection of Nineteenth-Century French Art. 2012.;Weisberg, Gabriel P., and François Bonvin. Bonvin. Paris: Éditions Geoffroy-Dechaume, 1979.;Sylvie Brame, email to Victoria Sears Goldman, Jan. 29, 2015, in CMA curatorial file.;Sylvie Brame, email to Victoria Sears Goldman, Jan. 29, 2015, in CMA curatorial file.;Hôtel Drouot. Tableaux modernes. 1976.Cleveland Museum of Art
https://www.clevelandart.org/art/1980.284Provenance After 1880-? Alfred Arago [1815-1892], Paris 1? Charles Guérin, Lyon 2 1977 (Sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, May 9-10, 1977 (no. 100), sold to Galerie Galerie Brame-Lorenceau) 3 1977 (Galerie Brame-Lorenceau, Paris, sold to Noah L. Butkin and Muriel S. Butkin) 1977-1980 Noah L. [1918-1980] and Muriel S. Butkin [1915-2008], Cleveland, OH, bequeathed to the Cleveland Museum of Art as a result of disclaimer by Muriel S. Butkin 1980- The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH;Provenance Footnotes 1 Inscribed “à son ami A Arago,” this painting was given by Rousseau to his friend, Alfred Arago. Arago was a student of Delaroche and painted genre, history, and landscape paintings. In 1853, during the most successful period in Rousseau’s career, Arago became Inspecteur des Beaux-Arts, an important post in the fine arts administration. Thus, the painting may have been not only a token of friendship but also a demonstration of Rousseau’s appreciation for Arago’s service. 2 Bernard Lorenceau of Galerie Brame-Lorenceau furnished CMA with the name Charles Guérin, whom Lorenceau identified as a professor in Lyon who had died by 1983. 3 The names of the consignors to this sale are not disclosed in the catalogue, which identifies the listed works only as coming from the “collection de Madame X et divers amateurs.” There are no specific indications that Guérin consigned any paintings to this sale, so the source of Rousseau’s painting remains unknown.;Provenance Citations;Estate of Noah L. Butkin, Bequests to Cleveland Museum of Art as a result of disclaimer by Murel S. Butkin. Estates, Gifts, and Funds, Series 1, Box 2:14. Cleveland Museum of Art Archives.;Phillippe Brame, letter to Linda Jackson, Oct. 4, 1983, in CMA curatorial file.;Sylvie Brame, email to Victoria Sears Goldman, Jan. 29, 2015, in CMA curatorial file.;d'Argencourt, Louise, Roger Diederen, and Alisa Luxenberg. European Paintings of the 19th Century. Cleveland: Cleveland Museum of Art, 1999.;Bernard Lorenceau, letter to Linda Jackson, Feb. 8, 1983.;Hôtel Drouot. Tableaux modernes. May 9-10, 1977.;Weisberg, Gabriel P. The Realist Tradition: French Painting and Drawing, 1830-1900. Cleveland: Cleveland Museum of Art, 1980.Cleveland Museum of Art
https://www.clevelandart.org/art/1983.70Provenance Charles Edwards. His sale, Paris, Drouot, 7 March 1870 (lot 33), "Sortie de forêt au coucher du soleil (site du Bas-Bréau), 1.07 x 1.30 m;1851, Exposition Universelle 1855," illustrated catalogue, 104 (repr.), ff 17,900 (sold to Saulnier according to annotated copy in the Frick Art Reference Library, N.Y.;sold to Brame according to an annotated copy in the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris). Ferdinand Barbedienne, Paris. Bought by Durand-Ruel & Cie (stock number 873), 12 March 1891, together with Corot's Cavaliers dans une allée, on behalf of James J. Hill, St. Paul. (Sent with the Corot to New York 18 March 1891.) Walter J. Hill, Livingston, Montana. Supposedly sold by Knoedler & Co., New York, in 1952 to a private collector in Beverly Hills, but the Knoedler stock book for 1952 does not list the painting. In the 1957 stock book, however, on 12 January, no. 5150, a Rousseau painting entitled "Wooded Landscape, 51œ x 43," was bought by Knoedler from Mrs. Charles McWilliams Jr. Sold to Richard L. Feigen for Edward D. Mittchell, Beverly Hills, on 16 January 1957. Sold by Richard L. Feigen & Co., on behalf of Mittchell, through Colnaghi, New York, to the CMA in 1983.Cleveland Museum of Art
https://www.clevelandart.org/art/1986.73Provenance (Boudin sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, Feb. 28, 1877, no. 30) 1 1 Aurélien Scholl [1833-1902], Paris 1 2 (Sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, June 17, 1921 (no. 52), probably sold to Galerie Allard & Noël) (Probably Galerie Allard & Noël, Paris) 1 3 (E. J. van Wisselingh & Co., Amsterdam) 1 4 Private collection, Washington, D.C., to Wildenstein & Co. (Wildenstein & Co., New York, sold to Emily Blossom) Emily Blossom [1913-1991], Cleveland, OH, given to the Cleveland Museum of Art The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH;Provenance Footnotes 1 1 A painting titled "Vue de Bordeaux" that matches the dimensions of the Cleveland picture appears in this sale of works by Boudin. 2 1 Scholl was the lender of the Cleveland picture to a Boudin exhibition at the École des Beaux-Arts in 1899. 3 1 The annotated copy of this catalogue held by Hôtel Drouot indicates that the buyer of the Boudin was “Allard.” This notation likely refers to Galerie Allard et Noël, Paris, which appears in the provenances of several other paintings by Boudin, including one currently in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (67.906). Schmit’s Boudin catalogue raisonné lists “Gérard, Paris” following the 1921 sale in this painting’s provenance. Gérard may refer to Félix Gérard, a dealer who lent a Boudin to the 1899 exhibition in which the CMA painting appears. More likely, “Gérard” may be Raphael Gérard, a dealer who held a Boudin retrospective exhibition in 1937 and who bought and sold a number of works by the artist. Raphael Gérard also appears following Galerie Allard & Noël in the provenance of a Boudin currently at the MFA Boston. Although this connection between Allard & Noël and Raphael Gérard does strongly suggest that the Cleveland picture passed through the latter’s hands, no primary documentation has been found that situates the painting with any dealer or collector by the name of Gérard. Following Gérard, Schmit includes Galerie Abels, Cologne, in the provenance, but again, thus far no confirmation that this dealer had the CMA painting has been located. 4 1 The CMA painting is no. 4 in the 1950 van Wisselingh & Co. exhibition, Maîtres français XIXme et XXme siècles. Following van Wisselingh, the Schmit catalogue raisonné lists dealer C. R. A. van Stolk, from Bergen, the Netherlands, no documentation of his involvement in the sale of the Cleveland Boudin has been found to date.;Provenance Citations;Schmit, Robert. Eugène Boudin, 1824-1898. Paris: Schmit, 1973.;Joseph Baillio, letter to Roger Diederen, Sept. 9, 1996, in CMA curatorial file.;E.J. van Wisselingh & co. Maîtres français XIXme et XXme siècles, 17 juillet-9 septembre 1950. Amsterdam: E.J. Van Wisselingh & Co, 1950.;Hôtel Drouot. Tableaux modernes. June 17, 1921.;Exposition des oeuvres d'Eugène Boudin, du 9 au 30 janvier 1899... [Paris], Ecole des beaux-arts. Paris (64 rue Amelot): Typ. Morris père & fils, 1899.;Hôtel Drouot. Tableaux modernes, aquarelles, dessins. Feb. 28, 1877.Cleveland Museum of Art
https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/437513Pearson, Paris (in 1927, his sale, Paul Cassirer, Berlin, October 18, 1927, no. 59, apparently bought in for 2,550 marks), private collection, Paris (until 1970, sold in March to Watteau), [André Watteau, Paris, 1970, sold in May to Humann], Christian Humann, Paris (1970–d. 1981, his estate, 1981–82, sold to Brame and Lorenceau), [Brame and Lorenceau, Paris, 1982, sold to MMA]Metropolitan Museum of Art
https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/436455René Petit-Le Roy, Paris (until 1903, sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, May 30, 1903, no. 23, as "Paysage avec rochers et constructions," together with no. 22 for Fr 1,205 to Lavillé), Monsieur Lavillé,?comte de Saint-Léon, château de Jeurre (until 1937),?[Nat Leeb, Paris, 1937–49, sold to Ujlaky],?[Alexandre Ujlaky, Paris, from 1949], [Paul Brame and César de Hauke, Paris, 1952–54, sold to Chrysler], Walter P. Chrysler Jr., New York (1954–d. 1988, on loan to The Chrysler Museum, Norfolk, from 1971, his estate sale, Sotheby's, New York, June 1, 1989, no. 110, sold to MMA)Metropolitan Museum of Art
https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/436533the artist's brother Theo van Gogh (d. 1891), his widow, Johanna van Gogh-Bonger, Amsterdam, in trust for their son, Vincent Willem van Gogh (until 1910, sold on December 29 for 3,600 guilders through J. H. de Bois, acting for C. M. van Gogh, to Kröller-Müller), Helene Kröller-Müller (Mrs. A. G. Kröller), The Hague, later Wassenaar (from 1910), her son, Anton George (Toon) Kröller, Jr., Harskamp (by May 24, 1927–d. 1938), his widow, Geertruida (Truusje) Kröller-Jesse, The Hague (1938–at least May 20, 1946), [D. Katz, Dieren, by September 8, 1947], [E. J. van Wisselingh & Co., Amsterdam], Siegfried Kramarsky, New York (by 1951–d. 1961), Kramarsky family, New York (1961–92, sold to MMA)Metropolitan Museum of Art
https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/486162Frédéric (Frédé) Gérard, Paris (1905–12, acquired from the artist in 1905, sold in 1912), Alfred Flechtheim, Düsseldorf (1912–14, sold in August 1914 for 7,000 marks, through Nils Dardel, to de Maré), Rolf de Maré, Hildesborg, Sweden, and Paris (1914–52, sold on June 10, 1952, for $40,000, to de Hauke and Brame), [César Mange de Hauke, New York and Hector Brame, Paris, 1952, sold on August 5, 1952 to Knoedler], [Knoedler and Co., New York, 1952, sold in September 1952, reportedly for $60,000, to Payson], Joan Whitney (Mrs Charles Shipman) Payson, Manhasset, New York (1952–d. 1975), her daughter, Mrs. Vincent (Lorinda) de Roulet, Manhasset (1975–89, sale, Sotheby's, New York, November 15, 1989, no. 31, sold to Annenberg), Walter H. and Leonore Annenberg, Rancho Mirage, California (1989–92, owned jointly with MMA, 1992–his d. 2002, his bequest to MMA)Metropolitan Museum of Art
https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/435867[Ambroise Vollard, Paris, until 1897, by exchange with three other Cézannes for cash and "un tableau de Lautrec de chez Boussod (femme à la toilette)," on January 25, to Loeser], Charles A. Loeser, Florence (1897–d. 1928), his wife, Olga Lebert Loeser, Florence (1928–d. 1947), their daughter, Matilda Loeser Calnan, Florence and Lausanne (1947–?1961), [?Bruscoli, Florence, from 1961], M. Guidi, Lausanne (until 1963, sold in September for $105,000 to Knoedler and de Hauke), [Knoedler, New York, and De Hauke and Co., New York, 1963, Knoedler stock no. A8539, sold for $77,150 to C. D. H. Inc., Paris], [Hector Brame, Paris, 1963, sold in November to Payson], Joan Whitney Payson, New York and Manhasset (1963–d. 1975)Metropolitan Museum of Art
https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/490750the artist (sold in 1899 or 1901 to Vollard), [Ambroise Vollard, Paris, from 1899 or 1901], private collection, France, [Brame & Lorenceau, Paris, until 1999, sold in 1999 to Devrishian], David Allen Devrishian, Fairfield, N. J. (1999, his gift to MMA)Metropolitan Museum of Art
https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/438857René de Gas, Paris, Maurice Exsteens, Paris (by 1946–61, consigned to Klipstein and Kornfeld, October 1960, sold to Klipstein and Kornfeld), [Galerie Klipstein and Kornfeld, Bern, 1961–65, sold to Wisselingh], [E. J. van Wisselingh & Co. Fine Art, Amsterdam, from 1965], UC San Diego Foundation (until 1976, sale, Sotheby's, Los Angeles, September 20–22, 1976, no. 277, for $11,500 to Ring), Sheldon Ring, Los Angeles (1976–96, sold by his estate on March 28, 1996, through Montgomery Gallery, San Francisco, to Korsant), Philip Korsant, Greenwich, Conn. (1996–2007)Metropolitan Museum of Art
https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/437153the artist, Paris (1864, sold on May 1 for Fr 8,000 to Napoleon), Prince Napoléon-Joseph-Charles-Paul Bonaparte, Paris (1864–68, sold on February 3, 1868, no. 10709, for Fr 14,000 to Durand-Ruel), [Durand-Ruel, Paris, in partnership with Brame, Paris, 1868, sold on March 6 for Fr 15,000 (to be paid in October 1868) to Herriman], William H. Herriman, Rome (1868–d. 1921, installed at 93, Piazza di Spagna, Rome, by January 18, 1869)Metropolitan Museum of Art
https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/436958Mlle Lemonnier, Paris [by 1882–at least 1902, sold to Gaston or Georges Bernheim], Van Wisselingh,?Paris (until 1899, sold on March 8 for Fr 1,000 to Durand-Ruel), [Durand-Ruel, Paris, 1899–1901, stock no. 5081, sold April 22 to Havemeyer], Mr. and Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer, New York (1901–his d. 1907), Mrs. H. O. (Louisine W.) Havemeyer, New York (1907–d. 1929, cat., 1931, pp. 148–49, ill.)Metropolitan Museum of Art
https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/436115the artist, Paris, later Fontainebleau (until d. 1860, his estate sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, April 29–30, 1861, no.1, for Fr 23,600, to Meyer), Leopold Meyer, Vienna (1861–67, his sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, April 27–28, 1866, no. 13, bought in[?] for Fr 14,100, sold on December 31, 1867, for Fr 14,000 or 14,500, [by exchange] to Goupil), [Goupil & Cie, Paris, 1867–69, stock no. 3244, sold on October 8, 1869, for Fr 15,000, to Redron], M. Redron (from 1869), Gustave Viot, Paris (by 1883–86, his sale, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, May 25, 1886, no. 1, for Fr 21,000, to Levesque), Levesque, Paris (from 1886), [Galerie Brame, Paris, until 1889, sold on July 25, 1889, for Fr 35,000, to Durand-Ruel], [Durand-Ruel, Paris, 1889, stock no. 2370, sold on August 21, 1889, for Fr 55,000, to Havemeyer], Mr. and Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer, New York (1889–his d. 1907), Mrs. H. O. (Louisine W.) Havemeyer, New York (1907–d. 1929, cat., 1931, pp. 104–5, ill.), her son, Horace Havemeyer, New York (1929)Metropolitan Museum of Art
https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/436527the artist's brother, Theo van Gogh, Paris (1888–d. 1891, sent to him by the artist on or about May 7, 1888), his widow, Johanna van Gogh-Bonger, Amsterdam (from 1891), [Kunstzalen Oldenzeel, Rotterdam, 1904], H. P. Bremmer, The Hague (1904–55, on loan to the Gemeentemuseum, The Hague, from 1924, cat., 1935, p. 77, no. 40–24), [E. J. van Wisselingh & Co., Amsterdam, 1955], [Wildenstein, New York, 1955–56, sold to MMA]Metropolitan Museum of Art
https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/359361Gustave Pellet (French)until 1919, Previously owned, by descent, Maurice Exteens(to at least 1937), César de Hauke, Le Vésinet (Private Collection), Private collection, France, Hector Brame(from whom MMA purchased)Metropolitan Museum of Art
https://www.philamuseum.org/collections/permanent/104473.htmlRoquet, Paris, sold to the dealer Brame, Paris, December 6, 1891, exchanged with Georges Lutz, Paris, December 9, 1891, sale, Lutz collection, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, May 26-27, 1902, no. 46. Mme. Albert Esnault-Pelterie (Gabrielle Testart) (1853-1936), Paris, by 1923 [1], her son, Robert Esnault-Pelterie (1881-1957), Paris, on loan to the Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1937-1954, sold to PMA, 1954.;1. According to Erich Klossowski, Honoré Daumier, Munich, 1923, no. 66, p. 91.Philadelphia Museum of Art
https://www.philamuseum.org/collections/permanent/319041.htmlPurchased from the artist by Durand-Ruel et Cie, Paris, December 16, 1893 [1], sold to Dudensing Galleries, New York, on July 21, 1920 [2], sold back to Durand-Ruel on November 23, 1929, and still owned in 1936. Sale, "Collection de Madame de R.," Paris, Musée Galliera, June 24, 1968, no. 62 ("Pommiers, soleil couchant, Éragny", illus.) [3], Madame Stubel, Brussels [4]. With Wally F. Galleries, New York (stock no. 26834), by October 9, 1968 [5], sold to John Charles Haas (1918-2011) and Chara Cooper Haas (1927-2012), Villanova, PA, October 12, 1968 [6], Chara Cooper Haas, gift to PMA, 2011.;1. Durand-Ruel photo no. 2682, and Durand-Ruel photographic archives no. 21166, according to Wally F. Galleries receipt.;2. Joachim Pissarro and Claire Durand-Ruel Snollaerts, Pissarro: Critical Catalogue of Paintings, Milan and Paris, 2005, no. 995. Pissarro and Snollaerts list the name as "Valentine Gallery", however, there was no gallery of that name until 1927. Most likely the painting was purchased by F. Valentine Dudensing on behalf of the gallery Richard Dudensing & Son, later Dudensing Galleries, belonging to his father, Frank, for whom he worked as manager at the time before opening his own gallery in 1926, named first the F. Valentine Dudensing Gallery and then the Valentine Gallery in 1927. Valentine Dudensing and his wife made the first of their annual buying trips to Europe in summer 1920 (communication from Julia May Boddewyn, March 6, 2017, in curatorial file). The Valentine Gallery specialized in modernist art, whereas the Dudensing Galleries specialized in 19th century art. However, it's possible that Valentine Dudensing subsequently acquired it for his own gallery and later sold it back to Durand-Ruel.;3. The consignor of this lot is listed as "Collection de Madame de R." (this collection is unidentified).;4. See Pissarro and Snollaerts, no. 995.;5. "Wally F." stands for Wally Findlay, the dealership is now known as Wally Findlay Galleries.;6. Copy of dated receipt from Wally F. Galleries to Mr. & Mrs. John C. Haas in curatorial file.Philadelphia Museum of Art
https://www.philamuseum.org/collections/permanent/72084.htmlPossibly Edwin and Ruth Edwards, London. Wilfred Harvey, Esq., Winsley Chase, Winsley, Somerset, before 1957, Findlay Galleries, Chicago [1]. Miss Martha Hyer [2]. With Wildenstein && Co., New York;sold to Charlotte Dorrance Wright (1911-1977) and William Coxe Wright (d. 1970), St. Davids, PA, December 9, 1961, until his d. 1970 [3], Charlotte Dorrance Wright, bequest to PMA, 1978.;1. Illustrated in an advertisement for Findlay Galleries, Antiques magazine, September 1957, p. 191.;2. According to a note in the curatorial file. Martha Hyer (b. 1924) was a movie actress in the 1960s. In 1966 she married Hal Wallis, and they had a collection of Impressionist and Modern paintings.;3. Information from 1977 Dorrance Wright estate inventory by Carroll Hogan (registrar file).Philadelphia Museum of Art
https://www.philamuseum.org/collections/permanent/72137.htmlPossibly with Mouwen (dealer), with Oldenzeel Art Gallery, Rotterdam, sold to Jan G. L. Nolst Trénité, Rotterdam, 1903, until at least 1939 [1], by inheritance to his children, sold to E. J. van Wisselingh & Co. Art Gallery, Amsterdam, about 1950, to 1958, sale, Sotheby's, London, December 3, 1958, no. 154, E. L. Catz, Curaçao, 1960 [2], with Lefevre Art Gallery, London, 1963-1965 (stock no. 269/63) [3], sold to Wildenstein & Co., New York, July 15, 1965, sold to Charlotte Dorrance Wright (1911-1977) and William Coxe Wright (d. 1970), St. Davids, PA, April 4, 1966, until his d. 1970 [4], Charlotte Dorrance Wright, bequest to PMA, 1978.;1. A letter in the curatorial file from Mr. A. S. Nolst Trénité, grandson of J. G. L. Nolst Trénité, dated December 4, 1970, includes a copy of his grandfather's cashbook confirming the 1903 purchase and suggests that a dealer named Mouwen may have purchased the painting from Van Gogh and sold it to Oldenzeel Art Gallery. De la Faille, Vincent van Gogh (New York and Paris, 1939), p. 170, no. 210, lists it as still being part of J. G. L. Nolst Trénité's collection. According to Trénité's letter, it passed by descent to J. G. L. Nolst Trénité's children (A. S. Trénité's aunt and uncle) who sold it to van Wisselingh Art Gallery, Amsterdam, around 1950. The gallery held it for eight years and exhibited it in 1956.;2. According to J.-B. de la Faille, The Works of Vincent van Gogh, New York, 1970, p. 180, no. F197.;3. Information from Lefevre Fine Art (communication dated 26 Feb. 2004, in curatorial file). The Lefevre Gallery included the painting in their exhibition, "XIX and XX Century French paintings," February 1962, no. 22, but according to their records they did not acquire it until 1963.;4. Per 1977 Dorrance Wright estate inventory by Carroll Hogan (registrar file).Philadelphia Museum of Art
https://www.philamuseum.org/collections/permanent/87537.htmlPurchased from the artist by Durand-Ruel & Cie, Paris, July 19, 1888, until 1913, sold to Dr. Oskar Troplowitz (1863-1918) and his wife Gertrud (Mankiewicz) Troplowitz (1869-1920), Hamburg, 1913-1920 [1], bequest to the Hamburger Kunsthalle, Hamburg, 1920, by exchange together with "Head of a Girl (Mlle Dobigny)" by Edgar Degas (Inv. Nr. E-2416) for "Feierabend" by Hans Thoma (Inv. Nr. 2734) to Karl Haberstock (dealer), Berlin, 1939, with Karl Haberstock, Berlin, 1939-1944, Reichsminister (retired) Geheimrat Dr. Heinrich Friedrich Albert (1874-1960), Berlin, September 1944-? [2]. With Rosenberg and Stiebel, New York, after May 8, 1945. With M. Knoedler & Co., New York, 1959 [3]. Louis H. Silver (1901-1963), Chicago, by 1963, Silver estate, Silver estate sale, Parke-Bernet, New York, April 6, 1967, no. 26. With Wally Findlay Galleries, New York, by 1973 [4]. Dr. F. Otto Haas, Philadelphia, gift of F. Otto Haas, and partial gift of the reserved life interest of his widow Carole Haas Gravagno to PMA, 1993.;1. Troplowitz was a Silesian-German pharmacist, entrepreneur and arts patron who bequeathed works by 19th and early 20th century French and German artists to the Hamburger Kunsthalle.;2. The preceding information courtesy of Dr. Ute Haug, Senior Curator, Provenance Research and Archiv, Hamburger Kunsthalle, email communication of March 6, 2012, in curatorial file.;3. See Parke Bernet 1967 sale catalogue.;4. See Guy-Patrice Dauberville and Michel Dauberville, Renoir: catalogue raisonné des tableaux, pastels, dessins et aquarelles, vol. 1, 1858-1881 (Paris, 2007), no. 41.Philadelphia Museum of Art
https://artmuseum.indiana.edu/provenance/view.php?id=71unknown dates, Findlay Galleries, Chicago;1992, Gift to IU Art Museum from IU Foundation;Remarks;Provenance research on this work is ongoing, and this record will be updated as more information becomes available.Indiana University Art Museum